Vi verbal learned borrowings 5 there are many learned

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VI. VERBAL LEARNED BORROWINGS5There are many learned borrowings in English that are derived from Latin verb stems:Latin VerbEnglish MeaningEnglish Derivative FormEnglish Meaningcaedo-caedere-caesumkill-cidekiller, killedfacio-facere-factummake-factmadefero-ferre-latumcarry, bear-fercarriervoro-vorare-voratumeat-voreeater
ExamplesLatin NounEnglish MeaningEnglish DerivativeFormEnglish NounEnglish Adjectivefrater, fratrisbrother-cidefratricidefratricidalars, artisskill-factartifactartificialconus, conicone-ferconiferconiferouscaro, carnisflesh-vorecarnivorecarnivorousWhat Do You Call That Word?All the terms used to describe the parts of speech in English are derived from Latin roots.noun= a word referring to a person, place, thing, state, or quality (nomen, nominis= name).verb= a word that expresses, action, existence, or occurrence (verbum, verbi= word).adjective= a word that modifies, or qualifies, a noun (adjicio-adjicere-adjectum =add to).adverb= a word that modifies or qualifies a verb or adjective.preposition= a word placed before a noun to form a phrase that modifies another noun, adjective, or verb(praepono-proponere-praepositum= place before).conjunction= a connector between words, phrases, clauses, or sentences (conjun- go-conjungere-conjunctum= join together).Gender DifferencesGender is a grammatical category that is used to classify nouns, pronouns, and adjectives (and in some languages, verbs).In the Romance languages, the gender of nouns can be determined by their articles (the). These articles are derived fromthe masculine and feminine forms of the Latin demonstrative adjective ille, illa = thatLatinSpanishFrenchItalianille= that (man)elleililla= that (woman)lalalaWhat Does That Mean?Sometimes an English word will retain its singular and plural Latin endings when it comes into English. For example, theLatin verb ago-agereproduces agenda, which literally means “the things that are to be done,” while erro-errare-erratum(wander, go astray) gives us erratum(singular) and errata(plural). How are these words used in English?Green, Tamara M.. The Greek & Latin Roots of English, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014. ProQuest Ebook Central, .Created from huntercollege-ebooks on 2017-09-26 17:13:41.Copyright © 2014. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. All rights reserved.
Anglo-Saxon SuffixesNot all English suffixes are Greek or Latin in origin. Old English (Anglo-Saxon) has left its mark on the formation ofmodern English vocabulary as well.Old English SuffixEnglish MeaningExample-ardpossessor ofdullard-er, -steragentdoer, gangster-lesswithouttoothless-fulfull oftruthful-somefull ofquarrelsome, toothsome-ishsomewhatfoolish-nessquality of, state ofhappiness, largeness-domstate of being, domain ofkingdom, martyrdom-hoodstate, condition, charactermotherhood, neighborhood-shipstate, condition, characterkingship, kinship

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