Ham promotes the idea of pure true love with the

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, Ham promotes the idea of pure, true love with the classic couple, Tilly and Teddy. In juxtaposition to Lesley and Mona, and William and Gertrude, whose partnerships were a result of succumbing to the pressures of society, Tilly and Teddy share a deep and real love. as much as Tilly tries to fool herself that she is not bothered by what others think of her, she is acutely concerned that ‘they’ll [the townsfolk] hate me [her] even more’ (Part 2) and is hounded by their hate of her, dreaming that the men of the town ‘stood shaking their fingers at her’ (Part 4) and that the residents will crawl up The Hill, armed with ‘firewood and flames, stakes and chains’ (Part 4) in a twisted amalgamation of a witch-hunt. Her fears bloom just as Teddy is buried and she fears the ‘football defeat’ (Part 3) will bring people to the house baying for her blood because she’d killed their star full forward.
BELONGING AND IDENTITY QUOTES Tilly stood alone in her brilliant magenta Lys Noir gown, then wrapped her shawl tight about her and reached for the handle. (after being spat at by Evan and called names by Beula at the social gathering) Part 2 T. Dunnage was printed lightly beneath T. McSwiney but it had been scribbled out.’ Part 2 … tragedy includes everyone… wasn’t everyone else in the town different, yet included? (at Teddy’s funeral) Part 3 ‘Now, look you. All of you. We danced. And Tituba conjured Ruth Putnam’s dead sisters. And that is all.’ (Abby threatening the girls) Act 1 ‘I think you best send Reverend Hale back as soon as he come. This will set us all to arguin’ again in the society, and we thought to have peace this year.’ (Rebecca Nurse is concerned that Hale’s appearance in the town will cause mischief) Act 1 ‘Your soul alone is the issue here, Mister, and you will prove its whiteness or you cannot live in a Christian country.’ (Danforth to Proctor) Act 4
TRUTH AND LIES IN THE DRESSMAKER In Ham’s The Dressmaker , the truth has little value; instead the citizens are embroiled in malicious gossip and snide falsifications that serve only to elevate their selfish needs. By the time Tilly returns to her hometown, the manner in which young Stewart Pettyman died had far become the thing of legend. The fact that small Tilly was ‘cornered beside the library… just trying to save herself’ (Part 3) became irrelevant and all that was remembered was the grotesque image of the ‘boy… with his neck broken and his round podgy body at right angles to his head’ (Part 3) and as such, Tilly had been sent away from the town. Ham’s writing in the latter half of the novel strips back the façade and the once ‘couturiered ladies of Dungatar’ (Part 2) become ‘snobby old Elsbeth… puny Mona… putrid gossiping Lois, leathery old sticky-beak Ruth, venomous Beula’ (Part 3) as Tilly (and inadvertently, the reader) become aware of the true nature of these women. Ham courageously addresses the theme of sex within the novel. The characters of Dungatar are besotted with

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