digital skills Sophisticated 76 say leadership has sufficient digital skills

Digital skills sophisticated 76 say leadership has

This preview shows page 16 - 18 out of 29 pages.

digital skills Sophisticated 76% say leadership has sufficient digital skills Digitally maturing companies behave differently than their less mature peers do. The difference has less to do with tech- nology and more to do with business fundamentals. Digitally maturing organizations are committed to transformative strategies supported by collaborative cultures that are open to taking risk. Equally important, leaders and employees at digitally maturing organizations have access to the resources they need to develop digital skills and know-how. CHARTING DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION Conclusion: The Contours of the End State
Image of page 16
STRATEGY, NOT TECHNOLOGY, DRIVES DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION MIT SLOAN MANAGEMENT REVIEW 15 Emory University professor Konsynski says that digital technology will provide a completely immer- sive experience: “Products such as the Google Glass wearable computing device and Oculus will bring augmented and virtual reality to levels we have never experienced in our personal or work lives.” Ben Waber, president and CEO of Humanyze, foresees dramatic growth in wearables: “I think computing will eventually be just in your clothing,” he predicts. Data will be more tightly infused into processes Organizational cultures must be primed to embrace analytics and the use of data in decision making and processes. In last year’s social business report, we found that socially mature organizations integrate social data into decisions and operations. 9 Twit- ter is meeting a similar need by expanding its scope from being just a social media platform to being a social and mobile analytics provider. In 2014, Twit- ter acquired the social data aggregator Gnip as part of Twitter’s strategy to create a new service offering that integrates social and mobile data with analytics to provide real-time business intelligence. Data is also changing the delivery of health care. “We can identify pathogens and chronic diseases quickly with rapid, low-cost diagnostic tools,” says John Brownstein, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School. “These tools can be connected directly to individu- als and create an aggregated view of the population’s health.” As Harvard chief digital officer Hewitt points out: “We are at the cusp of really interesting and valu- able predictive analytics for the enterprise.” Business models will reach their sell-by dates more quickly Leaders of the so-called “sharing economy” such as Uber, the mobile ride-services company, and Airbnb, the online accommodations marketplace, are re- writing the economics of their industries. Other disruptions are waiting in the wings. Emory profes- sor Konsynski points out that the very premise of ownership is fading away, and Millennials are less interested in ownership than are members of earlier generations. The onus is on leaders to stay ahead of the curve for their industries’ evolving business mod- els. “By the time it’s obvious you need to change, it’s usually too late,” says John Chambers, Cisco’s CEO.
Image of page 17
Image of page 18

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 29 pages?

  • Summer '19
  • The Land, Sloan Management Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, mit sloan management

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture