Copyright 1937 1938 1966 p 16 IV Language Language Refers to the entire body of

Copyright 1937 1938 1966 p 16 iv language language

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Copyright 1937, 1938, 1966, p. 16.
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IV. Language Language : Refers to the entire body of words in a text to determine the kinds of words and language being used. This is not to be confused with diction, where we look at specific word choices. WE WILL NOT WORK WITH LANGUAGE FOR NOW.
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V. Syntax Syntax : Sentence Structure. When examining diction, we are looking for the way in which the structure reflects attitude, purpose, and meaning. Examine… Sentence length Sentence beginnings The arrangement of ideas in a sentence The arrangement of ideas in a paragraph
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V. Syntax To Analyze and Describe the sentence structure consider the following: 1. Examine the sentence length . Are the sentences telegraphic (shorter than 5 words in length), medium (approximately 18 words in length), or long and involved (30 words or more in length)? Does the sentence length fit the subject matter? What variety of lengths is present? Why is the sentence length effective? 2. Examine sentence beginnings . Is there a good variety or does a pattern emerge? 3. Examine the arrangement of ideas in a sentence. Are they set out in a special way for a purpose? 4. Examine the arrangement of ideas in a paragraph. Is there evidence of any pattern or structure?
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V. Syntax-Sentence Patterns A declarative (assertive) sentence makes a statement: e.g., The king is sick. An imperative sentence gives a command: e.g., Stand up. An interrogative sentence asks a question: e.g., Is the king sick? An exclamatory sentence makes an exclamation: e.g., The king is dead!
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V. Syntax-Sentence Patterns cont. A simple sentence contains one subject and one verb: e.g., The singer bowed to her adoring audience. A compound sentence contains two independent clauses joined by a coordinate conjunction (and, but, or) or by a semicolon: e.g., The singer bowed to the audience, but she sang no encores. A complex sentence contains an independent clause and one or more subordinate clauses: e.g., You said that you would tell the truth. A compound-complex sentence contains two or more principal clauses and one or more subordinate clauses: e.g., The singer bowed while the audience applauded, but she sang no encores.
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V. Syntax-Sentence Patterns cont. A loose sentence makes complete sense if brought to a close before the actual ending: e.g., We reached Edmonton/that morning/after a turbulent flight/and some exciting experiences.
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