Armys composite risk management crm the purpose of

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Army’s Composite Risk Management (CRM)The purpose of risk management is to preserve the resources and assets by identifying, evaluating, and controlling risks. The goal is to minimize any losses of property, net income, or personnel (as cited in Vanvactor, 2007). The US Army defines an accident by any unplanned event which results in one or more of the following: job-related illness to Army military or Armycivilian personnel, Army civilian personnel injury while on-duty, Army military on-duty or off-duty injury, damage to Army property, damage to public or private property caused by Army operations, injury or illness to non-Army personnel caused by Army operations (AR 385-10, p. 22). The U.S. Army uses a five-step process to mitigate risk: (1) identification of hazards, (2) an assessment of those hazards, (3) a development of controls to aid with decision-marking, (4) an implementation of controls, and finally, (5) supervision and evaluation of safe execution (ATP 5-19, 2014).
ADVANCED AIRCRAFT AVIONICS AND DVE8Figure 2. From (Department of the Army, 2014)All Army Aviation units have a risk matrix they use to evaluate risk and determine where they can mitigate risk. The risk matrix using the five-step risk management is an effective tool for leaders. The matrix will usually identify areas of concern and how to address those issues. The five-step risk management is just one tool for leaders to use. Figure three defines and classifies a US Army accident. Class A is the most serious accident, and class E is the least serious accident. If aircrews are involved in a Class A or B aviation accident, they are grounded until the accident review board has determined the cause. Additionally, the aircrews are required to give a urinalysis and blood test. This is to ensure no drugs or alcohol was involved. Additionally, if those crews have been cleared of any negligence, they have to pass a physical exam and flight evaluation.
ADVANCED AIRCRAFT AVIONICS AND DVE9Figure 3. From (Department of the Army, 2014)Accident DataFrom 2002 to 2015 the US Army had 383 Class A and B accidents. Twenty-five percent of those accidents were caused by DVE. Of the 383 accidents caused by DVE, there was an 81% fatality rate and a total of $1 billion in lost material. A vast majority of these accidents occurred in Iraq and Afghanistan were 56% of the accidents occurred in brownout conditions (Drew, 2016). I’ll give a micro look at the Blackhawk and shed some light on the type of accidents, and the cost associated with DVE. The US Army Blackhawk is one of the work horse aircraft for the military. During 2010-2014 (2,120,00+ flight hours), the Blackhawk had 163 Class A-C mishaps.
ADVANCED AIRCRAFT AVIONICS AND DVE10There were 33 fatalities and total losses of $137 million dollars during a five-year period. The vast majority of the accidents (92%) were human error. Eight of the 22 Class A accidents were related to DVE that resulted in 18 fatalities (Higginbotham, 2014).

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