Both the text of the worksheets and this document should guide you through

Both the text of the worksheets and this document

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 8 pages.

Both the text of the worksheets and this document should guide you through preparing these deliverables. If you have any questions about data interpretation, you may always contact your MGMT 1 professor. For statistics-related questions, you can also see Lisa Green in Hughes 514. 1
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Guidance for Initial Reviews of the Data (Worksheet Part I) First, make sure to read the introductory pages of the report and each section of the report, as they provide key instruction on how to make sense of the data you’ll see. As you get into the Part I worksheet, note that your answer lengths will depend on your own report and how relevant a particular question is for you. Not every Part I worksheet answer will end up discussed in Part II. Usually, though, a handful of these answers will point to a pattern or theme you find important – and this is what you will delve into more deeply in Part II. So, completing the Part I worksheet is a kind of funneling process: laying out a number of data points, picking a handful of important results from this set, looking for connections between these points, and then preparing to distill this to the two central areas on which you want to spend more time. For many people, the feedback is “noisy”; for virtually everyone, the effort to connect the dots and identify a key strength and area for improvement through the noise has tangible rewards. In reviewing your feedback, treat the ratings and the qualitative comments as complementary sources of information. Written words are more vivid and easily remembered than numerical data. Thus, it’s possible to be unduly swayed by the written comments. Try to pay attention to both sources of information and see if the two may be integrated into a coherent story. Most people cycle through their reports many times, finding a qualitative comment and then looking for related evidence in the behavior and impression ratings, and then returning to review other comments. After Completing Part I: Seek additional input through reflection and extra live conversations with others Upon completing the Part I worksheet, start thinking about the one weakness and strength on which you intend to focus in Part II. At this point, many students find it extremely useful to gather some more information from outside the confines of the report. You can start by reflecting on experiences you’ve had that may be related to the data in the report. You may also benefit from following up with at least some of the people who provided feedback via live conversations. While this may feel awkward, know that you can do it in a way that leads to a constructive dialogue, especially with some advanced planning. When asking for more information on others’ perceptions of a weakness, in particular, try not to be overly defensive in introducing the topic. Your raters or others may be reluctant to tell you in person about their perceptions of a weakness, and if you come off as defensive, they’ll be even less likely to be candid with you. To open things up and
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