Implementation the process by which a law or policy is put into operation Iron

Implementation the process by which a law or policy

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Implementation: the process by which a law or policy is put into operation. Iron triangles: the relatively stable relationships and patterns of interaction that occur among agencies, interest groups, and congressional committees or subcommittees. Issue networks: the loose and informal relationships that exist among a large number of actors who work in broad policy areas. Interagency councils: working groups created to facilitate coordination of policy making and implementation across a host of government agencies. Administrative discretion : the ability of bureaucrats to make choices concerning the best way to implement congressional or executive intentions. Rule making: a quasi-legislative process that results in regulations that have the characteristics of legislative act. Regulations: Rules that govern the operation of all government programs that have the force of law Administrative adjudication : a quasi-judicial process in which bureaucratic agency settles disputes between 2 parties in a manner similar to the way courts resolve disputes Executive order: Rule or regulation issued by the president that has the effect of law. All executive orders must be published in the Federal Register
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UNIT 10: Public opinion: what the public thinks about a particular issue or set of issues at any point in time Public opinion polls. Interviews or survey with samples of citizens that are used to estimate the feelings and beliefs of the entire population. Straw poll: Unscientific survey used to gauge public opinion on a variety of issues and policies Sample : a subset of the whole population selected to be questioned for the purposes of prediction or gauging opinion Exit polls: polls conducted as voters leave selected polling places on Election Day Tracking polls: continuous surveys that enable a campaign or news organization to chart a candidate’s daily rise or fall in support Random sampling : A method of poll selection that gives each person in a group the same chance of being selected Stratified sampling : A variation of random sampling, the population is divided into subgroups and weighted based on demographic characteristics of the national population Margin of error : A measure of the accuracy of a public opinion poll Political socialization: the process through which individuals acquire their political beliefs and values
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UNIT 9: Judicial review: power of the courts to review acts of other branches of government and the states. Judiciary Act of 1789: Legislative act that established the basic three-tiered structure of the federal court system Marbury v. Madison (1803): Case in which the Supreme Court first asserted the power of judicial review by finding that the congressional statue extending the Court’s original jurisdiction was unconstitutional.
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  • Spring '16
  • Supreme Court of the United States, President of the United States, Federal government of the United States

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