United states v wong kim ark 1898 the court ruled

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public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality – a doctrine that came to be known as "separate but equal". United States v. Wong Kim Ark (1898) The Court Ruled… Which was historically significant because… United States v. Wong Kim Ark, 169 U.S. 649 (1898), is a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court ruled that "a child born in the United States, of parents of Chinese descent, who, at the time of his birth, are subjects of the Emperor of China, but have a permanent domicil and residence in the United States, and are there carrying on business, and are not employed in any diplomatic or official capacity under the Emperor of China",[4] automatically became a U.S. citizen at birth.[5] This decision established an important precedent in its interpretation of the Citizenship Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution.[6] …continued from previous page… Identify the ruling and significance of the court rulings listed below. Some of these cases may not be in your text."Insular Cases" / Downes v. Bidwell (1901) The Court Ruled… Which was historically significant because…
14 Downes v. Bidwell, 182 U.S. 244 (1901), was a case in which the US Supreme Court decided whether US territories were subject to the provisions and protections of the US Constitution. This issue is sometimes stated as whether the Constitution follows the flag. Northern Securities decision (1904) The Court Ruled… Which was historically significant because… Northern Securities Co. v. United States, 193 U.S. 197 (1904), was a case heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1903. The Court ruled 5 to 4 against the stockholders of the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railroad companies, who had essentially formed a monopoly, and to dissolve the Northern Securities Company. Lochner v. New York (1905) The Court Ruled… Which was historically significant because… Lochner v. New York, 198 U.S. 45, was a landmark U.S. labor law case in the US Supreme Court, holding that limits to working time violated the Fourteenth Amendment. This decision has been effectively overturned. Muller v. Oregon (1908) The Court Ruled… Which was historically significant because… Muller v. Oregon, 208 U.S. 412, was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court. Women were provided by state mandate, lesser work-hours than allotted to men. The posed question was whether women's liberty to negotiate a contract with an employer should be equal to a man's. Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918) The Court Ruled… Which was historically significant because… Hammer v. Dagenhart, 247 U.S. 251, was a United States Supreme Court decision involving the power of Congress to enact child labor laws. Schenck v. U. S. (1919) The Court Ruled… Which was historically significant because… Schenck v. United States, 249 U.S. 47, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case concerning enforcement of the Espionage Act of 1917 during World War I.

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