Prescriptive norms state what behavior is appropriate or acceptable For example

Prescriptive norms state what behavior is appropriate

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15.Prescriptive norms state what behavior is appropriate or acceptable. For example, norms based on custom direct us to open a door for a person carrying a heavy load. Page: 54 LO:1 16.Sanctions are informal norms or everyday customs that may be violated without serious consequences within a particular culture. Page: 55 LO:1 32
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Chapter 2 17.Whereas folkways are more informal, mores are more strongly held. 18.Taboos are mores so strong that their violation is considered to be extremely offensive and even unmentionable. In the United States, incest, or sexual or marital relations between certain categories of kin, is regarded as a taboo. Page: 55 LO:1 19.According to sociologist William Ogburn, cultural diffusion occurs when material cultural changes faster than nonmaterial culture, thus creating a gap between the two cultural components. 20.The United States is referred to as a heterogeneous society, meaning that it includes people who are dissimilar in regard to social characteristics such as religion, income, or race/ethnicity. Page: 59 LO:9 21.The largest religious group in the U.S. is made up of Roman Catholics. Page: 60 LO:11 Rejoinder: Although Roman Catholics make up over 23% in terms of religious affiliation, Evangelical Protestants are the largest religious group (25.9%) 22.A counterculture is a category of people who share distinguishing attributes, beliefs, values, and/or norms that set them apart in some significant manner from the dominant culture. For example, the Old Order Amish are considered a counterculture in the United States.
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