The beginning bestows the euphoria of a soul when it is given complete freedom

The beginning bestows the euphoria of a soul when it

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suspenseful and intense action captivates the interest of the audience. The beginning bestows the euphoria of a soul when it is given complete freedom of decision. The end again captures us with the plaint hero about to be ruined forever. In the interval between two events, there seems to be little for Faustus to do except to fill in the time. It seems that it had become a great dramatic problem for Marlowe to fill in the ‘middle portion’ of the play. If analytically viewed, the play doesn’t possess a middle to speak. If ever a middle has purpose to play, it is the experiences through which Faustus passes while enjoying the luxuries. At start Faustus had said: “I think hell’s a fable.” But at the end of the play we meet a ‘changed’ Faustus. In the end, he knows what hell is, and finding himself truly damned, he feels genuinely terrified. Dr. Faustus is a play about knowledge, about the relation of a man’s knowledge of the world, his knowledge of himself and knowledge of this universe, in all this, Marlowe has perhaps neglected the harmony of various parts of the play. The chief concern of the playwright seems to be the presentation of Faustus
________ Faustus dreams of power, his martial resolve, the subsequent vacillations of his mind, his agonizing last moments and his death. These form the main incidents of the drama, and give it whatever unity the drama has. When we endeavour to judge the structure of the play its start is somewhat traditional. The play opens with a speech by the chorus who gives us a brief ‘exposition’ of the theme. We see Faustus in his study and by the end of the first scene, the fatal decision to practice magic has been taken: “This night I’ll conjure, though I die therefore.” The encouragement comes from Valdes and Cornelius but the resolve is essentially his own. In the context, the first scene is masterfully depicted by Marlowe to present the conflicting mind of Faustus. The good angel and the Bad angel appear to propagate the weak faith and divided soul, indirectly preparing the readers for some bewitching decision. Between the two highly serious scenes of decision and actual conjuring, there is a comic interlude. The comedy depicted in this scene is no doubt, weak but it was the practice of many Elizabethan dramatists to place a parody with the emotional scenes. However, this interlude can’t be rejected by calling it a comic diversion. There is certainly a depth in clown’s reply to Wagner: How! My soul to the devil for a shoulder of mutton, though it were blood raw, not so, good friend.” The scene that follows depicts Faustus inner conflict, the Good angel and the Evil Angel urging him in apposite directions and the final signing of the bond by Faustus. This scene possesses a kind of glory that deserves to be in a great tragedy Mephistophilis tragic remarks: “For where we are is hell And where hell is there must we ever be.” Provide a climax to this scene and the readers’ involvement is intense.

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