Our experience suggests that the integration of qr

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consult Macalester, Wellesley, or Yale.) Our experience suggests that the integration of QR with argument has implications for graduation requirements that should be considered before imitating our method. Furthermore, any interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary collaboration may well speak to reimagining core skills and outcomes—an important and largely unforeseen result of the Carleton WAC/QR experience to date. Our curriculum review began in earnest in early 2008 when the Dean of the College convened three teams of faculty to propose new general education requirements. Each team essentially began with a blank slate. They would design, from scratch, a general education model. The three plans were presented to the faculty as a whole in the fall of 2008. Then, after discussion, the plans were revised and combined into two alternatives that were considered by the faculty in Winter 2009. While we knew that QuIRK would be able to lobby to add a QR requirement after the curricular design teams had completed their work, it was clear that it would be much easier to institute a standard if it were included in the teams’ initial reports. Nevertheless, QuIRK had little control over the design teams’ deliberations. The dean crafted each team to be more or less representative of the faculty as a whole. In particular, he did not place all the advocates of a “skills-based” model on one team and all of the supporters of “traditional silos” on another. Moreover, only one team included a member of QuIRK’s steering committee (although that one representative happened to be Neil Lutsky, the initiative’s founding director). In short, QuIRK 17
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lacked committed advocates on two of the three teams. Moreover, QuIRK faculty had not led an active drive for a QR requirement. The committee had no official position on a QR requirement and had not openly lobbied for such a graduation standard at faculty meetings or other faculty gatherings. Despite these liabilities our strategy of making QR relevant across the curriculum was successful: all three of the curriculum design teams recommended that the College add a QR requirement. Two of the three explicitly deferred to QuIRK in the design of the requirement. Far from having to fight for recognition of QR as an essential undergraduate learning goal, our efforts to tie QR with argument as relevant throughout the curriculum led to quick consensus that some form of a QR requirement be included in the new standards. QuIRK’s steering committee was subsequently asked to recommend a detailed requirement. We considered three possible components for our graduation standards: a QR methods course that would cover basic statistics and the social construction of numbers; designated QR courses that emphasized QR applications throughout the course; and designated “QR encounters” that included a substantial assignment or course module demonstrating and teaching the use of QR in context.
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