9 responderunt plurima arma a militibus ad litus

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Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 27
Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
Larson
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9. Responderunt plurima arma a militibus ad litus allata esse et in navibus condita esse. They answered that very many arms had been brought by the soldiers to the shore and (had been) stored in the ships. 10. Cum parentes essent vivi, felices erant; mortui quoque sunt beati. When your parents were alive, they were happy; (but even) dead (in death) they are also blessed. 11. Nescio utrum tres coniurati maneat an in exsilium contenderint. I do not know whether the three conspirators are remaining or have hastened into exile.
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Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 27
Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
Larson
Expert Verified
2 TEACHER’S GUIDE and ANSWER KEY for WHEELOCK’S LATIN: Ch. 31 12. Nos conferamus ad cenam, mei amici, bibamus multum vini, consumamus noctem atque omnes curas nostras minuamus! Let us go to dinner, my friends, drink much wine, consume the night and lessen all our cares! 13. When the soldiers had been arrested, they soon offered us money. Cum m § lit s compreh ns § essent, n ˙ b § s pec ª niam mox obtul runt. (Here and in the following sents., the cum clause could be replaced with an abl. abs., e.g., m § litibus compreh ns § s. ) 14. Although life brings very difficult things, let us endure them all and dedicate ourselves to philosophy. Cum v § ta ferat difficillima (r s difficillim ~ s), (tamen) omnia (omn s) fer ~ mus et philosophiae (sapientiae) n ˙ s d dic mus (d mus). (Using the standard SOV order in the cum clause would result in the ambiguous juxtaposition v § ta difficillima, which a good Roman stylist would avoid.) 15. Since you know what help is being brought by our six friends, these evils can be endured with courage. Cum sci ~ s quod auxilium ~ sex am § c § s nostr § s fer ~ tur, haec mala cum virt ª te ferr § possunt. 16. Although his eyes could not see the light of the sun, nevertheless that humble man used to do very many and very difficult things. Cum ocul § eius l ª cem s ˙ lis vid re n ˙ n possent, tamen ille vir humilis pl ª rima difficillimaque ag bat (faci bat). (Again, one could use r s pl ª rim ~ s difficillim ~ sque, but the n. substantive is more usual.) SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE 1. Potestne haec lux esse tibi iucunda, cum scias hos omnes consilia tua cognovisse? 2. Themistocles, cum Graeciam servitute Persica liberavisset et propter invidiam in exsilium expulsus esset, ingratae patriae iniuriam non tulit quam ferre debuit. Themistocles, since he had freed Greece from Persian slavery and been driven into exile on account of hatred (political animosity), did not endure his thankless nation’s injustice which he ought to have endured. 3. Quae cum ita sint, Catilina, confer te in exsilium. And since these things are so, Catiline, go into exile.

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