Suggested increasing the severity of prohibitory

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suggested increasing the severity of prohibitory enactments and to maintain the dignity of the laws and to remove a great evil from among the peopleargued this was a danger to the people so it must be considered of great importance as the people are the foundation of the nationsaid the laws were not wanting in severity but those in office who, for want of energy, fail to carry them into execution42. Social repercussions of opium43. Commissioner Lin Zexu-Known for upholding moral standard. Gave an ultimatum to all merchants(give up opium or leave); Most merchants left except the EIC-appointed by duanhong-lins ultimatum: All of those trading opium, if you want to keep your supply, LEAVE CHINA NOW!If you want to continue trading opium, you must trade it all in to the Chinese government44. Confiscation of British opium-Blockaded British opium by removing Chinese servants from the warehouses and British had to wash down 20000 chest of opium.Lin Zexu, no questions asked, mixed the opium with water and lime (making it useless) and washed it out to sea45. Letter to Queen Victoria-Lin Zexu wrote a memorial to Queen Victoria to list his grievances about how the Chinese send silk, spices, and
porcelain to Britain in return gets poison. The letter was never delivered since the British foreign ministry decided to keep it.
46. Charles Elliot’s guarantee-British naval officer, diplomat, and colonial administrator. He became the first administrator of Hong Kong in 1841 while serving as both Plenipotentiary and Chief Superintendent of British Trade in China. He was a key founder in the establishmentof Hong Kong as a British colonytold british merchants they would get compensated for opium given up to chinese47. Treaty of Nanjing 1842-Signed on August 29 1842 to mark the end of the first Opium War. Signed between England, Ireland, and Qing Dynasty of China. First of what the Chinese called unequal treaties because British had no obligations in return.Use of force to "bail out" opium merchantsBritish steamers vs. Chinese junts
49. Extraterritoriality-British citizens were still under British law in China. If they
committed a crime, Chinese jurisdiction would be useless.

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