The most prominent obstacle of completing this project was time management and

The most prominent obstacle of completing this

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The most prominent obstacle of completing this project was time management and scheduling rehearsals. Everyone has a completely different schedule, and at most times the entire group could not meet. The two actors either just only met with the director, dramaturg, designer, etc, separately. However, something that all group members compromised was who provided which props for the stage setup. Thinking of everything we needed, according to the designer’s setting design, was a very quick and enjoyable process and everyone had brought what they had agreed to. Additionally, deciding whether to stick to representing the play accurately; mainly, the actors and designer had to come to a consensus on this. This initially seemed like a challenging aspect of conjuring up well-delivered scene. Fortunately, we all quickly agreed to the theme and level of authenticity. Because of our choices of non-traditional castings, there were several disputes about the dressings of Prior. At first, some of us stated that we should addressed Prior’s masculinity. But then we came to the agreement about the queer identity of Prior and decided the costume. Another success was actually setting up the props and lighting on the day of presenting the scenes. Given that most of us just moved to Seattle, we didn’t have many tools and fabrics to use for making our props. Therefore, we had to improvise and change the set design of the
13 original play in order to fit with what we had and could use. For instance, we used a black feather instead of the grey feather mentioned in the play. This decision changed the interpretation of the angel in the play and made it seem darker and more in contrast with the characters’ dreams. This design change worked in our favor to have the feather be more noticable, rather than using a white feather as we initially decided on. The process of making the marketing tools was also faced with a number of problems. We had to find proper printers that could print out the posters in the bold colors it had. We also had to edit and re-edit the posters and the press release to fit the director’s vision as much as possible. The actors also commented on the design of the posters and the stage which definitely made our presentation worth watching. The incorporation of nearly every single theatre practitioner allowed for the publicity manager to create a final draft of the program that we were all proud of. Subsequently, the biggest concern of constructing our scene was timing and cues. For the actors, cues to perform a specific, subtle action was in the dialogue. They had to be aware of that while smoothly delivering the act. There was also a concern for how we wanted Harper to appear in the scene. Since this was a dream sequence, it was pivotal for Harper to ‘appear’ out of nowhere, and we were unsure of how to do that. Due to the stage being a classroom, rather than a proscenium, there were no curtains to hide behind. Then the designer had the idea that she would

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