Dont have a large network o went to big band dances 9

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Don’t have a large networkoWent to big band dances#9 “Conga Brava” – Duke Ellington, Big Band Swing (1940)More organizedFast tempoSolos; both improv & written solosArranged – sheet music involvedRise of the Solo Singer1.No strikeoSingers belonged to a different union than musiciansoAFTRA – American Federation of Television & Radio Artists2.1930s – 1940s: microphone became a thingoPrivate & sexyoMade them knowableoHelped build a star industryDuring WWII, 29 out of 43 records sold were big band1945: big bands start to fadeoNo more need in big cities as people went back home after WWIIoToo expensiveoSolo singer started to riseoBallrooms shut downBig bands replaced by jump bands e.g. Louis Jordan & the Tympany FiveBillboard Magazine
oCharts pop, hillbilly / countryo1942: had a “race” music charto1949: race music became Rhythm & BluesJump bands were smaller & cheaperUntil 1948 – a few national networks dominated the radiooABC, CBS, NBC dominated radioTelevision emergesoBid radio companies pulled money out of radio; put into TVoIndependent radio becomes more possible“Kids” youth with more money after WWIIoCars gave them radio freedomoYouth culture starts; 1styouth identityAlan Freed – Cleveland oPlayed black artists on traditional “white stations”Rhythm & BluesAn era of music between 1945 & 1960 was the “golden age” of R&BR&B – dance & joySpeeds up blues & makes it happyLike big band but smaller & with black musical structureLouis Jordan known as “father of R&B”#10 “Choo Choo Ch’Boogie” – Louis Jordan, R&BAfrican AmericanoLike blues – 12 bar structureoBoogie WoogieWhiteoNo aab lyricsoClear enunciationHybridoBoth 12 bar (black) with arranged 20 bar sections (big band)
Lecture 8Rise of the Microphone1.Increased intimacy2.Not yelling; can sing more softly3.Words more enunciated4.Fuller voices; less strainedVocalist– crooneroLead vocalist in jazz & other genresRock & RollCombination of genresCovers of original songsoWhite artists covering R&BWomen dropped off the charts; especially white womenoLate 1940s – white females on 1/3 of chartsoObliterated from charts as women were not a part of early rock & rollWomen were in lyrics; especially referred to as “babies”A few record labels dominated in late 1940s 1)Decca2)Capitol3)Columbia4)VictorBig 4 record labels held 80% of marketRecord labels lost power for 2 main reasons:1)New independent radio stations2)45 record – only 2 sides: A side & B sideCheaper musicOne more change in early 1950s: “Top 40 radio”oSongs in heaviest rotationo“Chains” – businessperson owned multiple businesses e.g. radio station, car rental, bookstoreDidn’t care about music; just wanted to earn moneyoTodd Storz & Gordon McLendonCreate Top 40 Radio to reach the kids in school & after school

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