Probability and statistics in this lesson you will

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Probability and Statistics In this lesson, you will identify and count the outcomes of experiments.
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Section 10.1 Outcomes and Events 401 Work with a partner. a. Play Rock Paper Scissors 30 times. Tally your results in the table. b. How many possible results are there? c. Of the possible results, in how many ways can Player A win? Player B win? the players tie? d. Does one of the players have a better chance of winning than the other player? Explain your reasoning. ACTIVITY: Rock Paper Scissors 3 4. IN YOUR OWN WORDS In an experiment, how can you determine the number of possible results? Use what you learned about experiments to complete Exercises 3 and 4 on page 404. Rock Scissors Paper Player A Player B Rock breaks scissors. Paper covers rock. Scissors cut paper. Interpret a Solution How do your results compare to the possible results? Explain . Math Practice
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402 Chapter 10 Probability and Statistics Lesson 10.1 EXAMPLE Identifying Outcomes 1 You roll the number cube. a. What are the possible outcomes? The six possible outcomes are rolling a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. b. What are the favorable outcomes of rolling an even number? even not even 2, 4, 6 1, 3, 5 The favorable outcomes of the event are rolling a 2, 4, and 6. c. What are the favorable outcomes of rolling a number greater than 5? greater than 5 not greater than 5 6 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 The favorable outcome of the event is rolling a 6. Lesson Tutorials Key Vocabulary experiment, p. 402 outcomes, p. 402 event, p. 402 favorable outcomes, p. 402 Outcomes and Events An experiment is an investigation or a procedure that has varying results. The possible results of an experiment are called outcomes . A collection of one or more outcomes is an event . The outcomes of a specific event are called favorable outcomes . For example, randomly selecting a marble from a group of marbles is an experiment. Each marble in the group is an outcome. Selecting a green marble from the group is an event. Possible outcomes Event: Choosing a green marble Number of favorable outcomes: 2 Reading When an experiment is performed at random or randomly , all of the possible outcomes are equally likely.
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Section 10.1 Outcomes and Events 403 EXAMPLE Counting Outcomes 2 You spin the spinner. a. How many possible outcomes are there? The spinner has 6 sections. So, there are 6 possible outcomes. b. In how many ways can spinning red occur? The spinner has 3 red sections. So, spinning red can occur in 3 ways. c. In how many ways can spinning not purple occur? What are the favorable outcomes of spinning not purple? The spinner has 5 sections that are not purple. So, spinning not purple can occur in 5 ways. purple not purple purple red, red, red, green, blue The favorable outcomes of the event are red, red, red, green, and blue. 2. You randomly choose a marble. a. How many possible outcomes are there?
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