Jones H 1995 Issues in early childhood education Implications and directions

Jones h 1995 issues in early childhood education

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Jones, H. (1995). Issues in early childhood education: Implications and directions for higher education. Peabody Journal of Education , 70 (3), 112-124. Kottman, T. (2004). Play therapy. In A. Vernon (ed.), Counseling Children and Adolescents,
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Third Edition . Denver: Love Publishing Company (pp. 111-136). Laosa, L. (2005). Effects of preschool on educational achievement. Lopez, M. L., Tarullo, L. B., Forness, S. R., & Boyce, C. A. (2000). Early identification and intervention: Head Start’s response to mental health challenges. Early Education and Development , 11 (3), 265-282. Maeroff, G. (2003). Universal pre-kindergarten: State of play. Report from The Foundation for Child Development (pp. 4-12). Ramey, S.L. (1999). Head Start and preschool education: Toward continued improvement. American Psychologist , 54 (5), 344-346. Sellers, N., Satcher, J., & Comas, R. (1999). Children’s occupational aspirations: Comparisons by gender, gender role identity, and socioeconomic status. Professional School Counseling , 2 (4), 314-317. Stroeher, S.K. (1994). Sixteen kindergartners’ gender-related views of careers. The Elementary School Journal , 95 (1), 95-103. Webster-Stratton, C. & Taylor, T. (2001). Nipping early risk factors in the bud: Preventing substance abuse, delinquency, and violence in adolescence through interventions targeted at young children (0-8 years). Prevention Science , 2 (3), 165-192. Appendix A Example Activity Topic : Anger Management Modality : Individual play therapy (could also be used for group therapy) Materials needed : 2 balloons, markers “I don’t know about you, but there are some times that I get really angry. Are there ever any times that you feel angry?” Invite child to share something that makes him or her angry. o Draw some representation of that person, thing, or event on the balloon.
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o Ask the child how he/she responds in that situation when he/she gets mad. o Blow air into the balloon to represent anger building up in the child’s body. o Ask child what happened to the balloon when he/she got angry (E.g., “It got bigger.”) o Repeat the sequence several times, depending on time and age of child (asking what makes child angry, drawing on balloon, asking how he/she responds, and blow more air into the balloon). o Invite child to reflect on what might happen if he/she kept getting angry, and you kept blowing air into the balloon (E.g., “It would pop!”) o Explain that you wonder what that would look like, and pop the balloon (using pen tip, for example) o Ask child what happened to the balloon (E.g., “It broke!” or “It’s in a bunch of pieces!”) Invite child to think about things he/she could do instead to keep from “breaking” when he/she gets mad in the future. Child thinks while you blow air into the new balloon. o When the balloon is full of air, summarize a situation the child described that makes him/her angry, and draw it on the balloon.
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