Debt international law allows whoever has effective power to take out debt for

Debt international law allows whoever has effective

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Debt: international law allows whoever has effective power to take out debt for all its citizens If dictators are replaced by democratic governments, they are faced to repay debts that were used to oppress their people World negotiations: Rich countries have more bargaining power, can afford to sent delegates to all trade conferences and have more experience bargaining Poor countries have little bargaining power, can't always afford to send delegates and have little experience bargaining Tariffs: 1st world farming subsidies unfairly hurt the 3rd world Past-crimes: We shouldn't uphold extreme inequality in starting points but we are not responsible for making up for past atrocities The West still benefits from neo-colonialism: we don't pay fair market prices for resources Pollution: The GR get the most benefit of resources and the GP suffer most of the costs GR doesn't pay for externalities Because of these above factors the GP don't have fair entitlement to their resources-- they don't even have access to a subsistence level of resources Pogge's Central argument: by coercively imposing a global institutional order on the global poor that foreseeably engenders massive severe poverty, we are violating on a huge a negative duty toward them not to severely harm them Pogge's claims: 1. The global poor are excluded without compensation from the use and benefits of natural resources a. The interaction of global and domestic social institutions together have the effect of funnelling resources to the global elite and depriving the global poor of a minimally adequate share of the means of subsistence 1. Global trade-laws are unfair, and slanted in favour of richer countries 2. The effects of a common violent history: the current global institutional order upholds extreme inequality that can be traced to the effects of a common history involving grievous injustices Pogge's account of human rights: 1. Institutional rather than interactional: human rights are claims against social institutions; they are claims against individuals only via their institutional roles or their membership of social institutions
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