when she begins to think impartially and reconsider both sides to the story

When she begins to think impartially and reconsider

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when she begins to think impartially and reconsider both sides to the story (Wickham’s story versus Darcy’s story) and thankfully discerns the accurate truth the second time around. Once she finds that Darcy is telling the truth, her eye is opened to all the negativity surrounding Wickham and all the positive qualities that Darcy possesses. It is also ironic that Elizabeth once
Chung 9 thought Darcy was proud and full of himself, but it is actually she herself who held onto too much pride. Austen wishes to educate her readers about the follies of judging someone before truly knowing them, and it is highlighted extremely well in this passage.
Chung 10 Analysis: Symbolism Pemberley not only reflects its owner, Darcy’s, refined tastes, but also embodies his characteristics. For instance, the solid stone, which the large estate is built out of, stands firmly on a slope, which could represent Darcy’s wisdom and strength. Its “high woody hills” providing background could potentially stand for Darcy’s family background as well, which holds him up so high in self-esteem and pride. The winded road which leads to the house implies that it may take a while to arrive there because of all the turns (or understand Darcy’s true personality because of all the distinct qualities he has), or that the road represents a road that very few people are able to get across, so very few people understand and know the true Darcy. Out in the front, the stream of “natural importance” refers to Darcy’s own air of natural importance, but without “artificial appearance” or fakeness. He is seen the way people want him to be seen, “swelled into something greater,” but without boasting it by “falsely [adorning]” himself, just as the stream’s banks are “neither formal nor falsely adorned.” Darcy is noted to be more casual and comfortable at his estate, where he is surrounded by people he trusts and knows, and more formal and rigid outside of Pemberley (for example, at Netherfield), where he is surrounded by strangers who expect to see him that way. As a final proof that Pemberley exists as a symbol of Darcy, Elizabeth’s pleasure at seeing the “natural beauty” of estate and the nature surrounding it reflects Elizabeth’s growing feelings for Darcy, once she fully understands who he really is, without all of the fancy formalities and adornments.
Chung 11 Analysis: Setting In the first two paragraphs of her novel, Austen has already established its basic plotline: either a man of a sizeable inheritance chases after a girl, or many girls chase after that one man with a sizeable inheritance, or a mixture of both. In addition, Austen has also already set the light, happy tone for the novel when she wittily comments on the man being the “property” of girls. Such a thought appears radical in early 19 th century England (which is the physical setting of Pride and Prejudice ) because society back then had been based on class structure and social status. Thus, marriage is of utmost importance – especially for young women. So many girls had

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