A typical Solaris 8 installation requires about 20 minutes of operator

A typical solaris 8 installation requires about 20

This preview shows page 34 - 39 out of 42 pages.

A typical Solaris 8 installation requires about 20 minutes of operator interaction, then for the next hour (or more) no interaction is required. RedHat Linux installations are similar to Solaris in regards to operator interaction. While MOST UNIX installations often take care of the interactive portion up-front, a few of the installers “hold the user’s hand” throughout the installation process (much like Windows).
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Installation Methods Network Installations Most versions of UNIX support a network-based installation system of one form or another. Like Windows, these installers require a network-based boot server, rules files that dictate how the installation is performed, and a boot daemon that runs on the server to manage the process. The Solaris JumpStart package is one such network-based installer. Sun’s WebStart and the Linux KickStart service are other examples of the automated network-based installer. Because there is no official standard for these network- based tools, and each vendor has one (or more) of these installers, describing all of the current offerings is difficult, if not impossible.
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Installation Methods Linux Kickstart Linux may be “kickstarted” from a bootable floppy diskette or from a network-based boot server. The floppy diskette must contain a configuration file named ks.cfg . This file is the Linux equivalent of the Windows “answer file” for an unattended installation. To perform a network installation, you need to have a DHCP server running on your network. The DHCP server instructs the new system how to contact the boot service machine identified in the ks.cfg file.
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Installation Methods The Kickstart process requires a “rules” file to control the installation. The ks.cfg file contains several directives that tell the installer how, and what, to install on the system. The format of the ks.cfg file is as follows. <command section> <a list of %pre, %post, and/or %packages directives> <installclass> The easiest way to create a Kickstart file is to use the Kickstart configurator utility supplied on the distribution media. To start a Kickstart install, you use a special boot floppy. The boot floppy may contain a CD-ROM or network “boot block.” In either case, you start the boot with the following command. Boot: linux ks=floppy # ks.cfg resides on the floppy # ks.cfg resides on NFS fileserver Boot: linux ks=nfs:<server_name:>/path_to_ks.cfg
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Installation Methods Solaris Network Boot Service Daemon To provide a Solaris installation server, you must build and configure a system that will listen for install requests, and know how to deliver the proper files to the host being installed. This requires the sysadmin to complete the following two major tasks.
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