Psychology in Action 9th Edition

Psychology in Action

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information, from the participant point of view, is invaluable in illuminating many aspects of "truth" in the complex interactions that take place in human relationships, either in "real" life or in an institutional setting. Adapted from Hock, R. (1992). Forty studies that changed psychology . Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Instructor's Resource Guide               Chapter 1                                 Page 12
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  K ey T erms INTRODUCING PSYCHOLOGY experimenter bias (p. 22) critical thinking (p. 4) independent variable (IV) (p. 24) nature–nurture controversy (p. 6) misattribution of arousal (p. 27) psychology (p. 4) naturalistic observation (p. 29) participant bias (p. 26) ORIGINS OF PSYCHOLOGY placebo [pluh-SEE-bo] (p. 25) behavioral perspective (p. 11) random assignment (p. 26) biopsychosocial model (p. 14) sample bias (p. 25) cognitive perspective (p. 12) survey (p. 30) evolutionary perspective (p. 12) humanistic perspective (p. 11) neuroscience/biopsychology perspective (p. 12) positive psychology (p. 12) psychoanalytic/psychodynamic perspective (p. 10) sociocultural perspective (p. 13) THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY applied research (p. 16) basic research (p. 16) debriefing (p. 19) hypothesis (p. 17) informed consent (p. 18) meta-analysis (p. 16) operational definition (p. 17) theory (p. 17) RESEARCH METHODS biological research (p. 33) case study (p. 30) control group (p. 24) correlation coefficient (p. 32) correlational research (p. 31) dependent variable (DV) (p. 24) descriptive research (p. 28) double-blind study (p. 25) ethnocentrism (p. 25) experiment (p. 21) experimental group (p. 24) Instructor's Resource Guide               Chapter 1                                 Page 13
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D iscussion Q uestions 1. The goals of psychology (describe, explain, predict, and change) are a part of what we all do in our everyday lives. Ask students to generate specific examples. Then ask for suggestions where these goals might become unethical and unacceptable. They MAY remember the movie Clockwork Orange , which you could use as an extreme example. 2. PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals , is an animal rights organization that believes that it is wrong to use animals for experimental research. To what extremes should society go to protect the right of animals and at what point is all animal research unwarranted? Ask the students to think about their own feelings overnight and ask for volunteers to express their views at the beginning of the next class period. Would they side with PETA? Why or why not? 3. Is it really necessary to use the experimental method to study human behavior or is the correlational method sufficient? Ask students to write a short answer in class. 4. Ask students to describe how their ideas about psychology and psychologists have changed after reading this first chapter. Discuss how television and movie portrayals might negatively influence the viewer. Ask students to "vote" on the most interesting, most useful, and/or most appealing of the five major perspectives--psychoanalytic, behavioristic, humanistic, cognitive, or biological.
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