What does blaut argue about the modes of production

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2)What does Blaut argue about the modes of production, urbanization, class structures, and systems of spatial exchange in different societies? What examples does he use to prove his argument?Marxists argues that medieval non-European agricultural modes of production were somehow lacking in the potential for change that we associate with the European feudal modeo“Asiatic mode of production” ; “Oriental despotism”
spatial pattern – class-stratified mode was dominant in nearly all agricultural regions of Asia, with clear patterns of landlord-peasant conflict; more than half of Africa, Europe, and Asia, and some parts of Oceaniathe ruling class in feudal societies is almost everywhere, a landlord class but with many different legal formsogrants tended to become hereditaryoproperty is private so long as an individual or kin group continues to hold valid control; The Chinese gentryoThe European feudal-era landlord class was not more advanced or ready for capitalism and modernityThe manorial system including coordinated demesne farming with corvee labor in gangs was well as peasant holdings, and wit some manufacture along with agricultural production on the manor was found in China and in southern India; demesne farming was not dominant throughout EuropeThe producing class in feudalism consists, usually, of peasants; serfdom is often thought to be the characteristic labor form of feudalism in Europe and here and there in Africa and AsiaWe cannot assert simply that feudalism is a “stage” of evolution, and must eventually give way to the next, higher “stage” of evolution (capitalism); or that feudalism gives way to a higher and more “modern” form of society (capitalism) as a result of humanity’s inevitable forward progress, social, intellectual, and moral; or a Malthusian force of inevitably heightening population pressureTwo essential facts about this form of society: The fact of family-scale farming as a way of life; the fact of a landlord class extracting, or trying to extract, an ever-increasing absolute surplus from farmersAssumption that improvements in agricultural production are taking place through innovations mainly on the farm itself

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