Chief of Executive Commander in Chief Chief Diplomat Legislative leader

Chief of executive commander in chief chief diplomat

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Chief of Executive Commander in Chief Chief Diplomat Legislative leader Judicial Powers Party leader CONT. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PRESIDENT
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THE PRESIDENT HAS THE POWER EITHER TO SIGN LEGISLATION INTO LAW OR TO VETO BILLS ENACTED BY CONGRESS, ALTHOUGH CONGRESS MAY OVERRIDE A VETO WITH A TWO-THIRDS VOTE OF BOTH HOUSES. THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH CONDUCTS DIPLOMACY WITH OTHER NATIONS, AND THE PRESIDENT HAS THE POWER TO NEGOTIATE AND SIGN TREATIES, WHICH ALSO MUST BE RATIFIED BY TWO-THIRDS OF THE SENATE. THE PRESIDENT CAN ISSUE EXECUTIVE ORDERS, WHICH DIRECT EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OR CLARIFY AND FURTHER EXISTING LAWS. THE PRESIDENT ALSO HAS UNLIMITED POWER TO EXTEND PARDONS AND CLEMENCIES FOR FEDERAL CRIMES, EXCEPT IN CASES OF IMPEACHMENT. CONT. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PRESIDENT
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EVOLUTION OF PRESIDENTIAL POWER THROUGHOUT THE 1800S UNTIL THE 1930S, CONGRESS WAS THE DOMINANT BRANCH OF THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. THEN, THROUGHOUT THE REST OF THE 20TH CENTURY, THE BALANCE OF POWER SHIFTED DRAMATICALLY, SO THAT THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH CURRENTLY HAS AT LEAST EQUAL POWER TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH. ARTICLE II OF THE CONSTITUTION DEFINES THE QUALIFICATIONS, BENEFITS, AND POWERS OF THE PRESIDENCY. THE PRESIDENT MUST BE AT LEAST 35 YEARS OLD, AND MUST HAVE RESIDED IN THE UNITED STATES FOR NO FEWER THAN 14 YEARS. PRESIDENTS MUST BE "NATURAL BORN" CITIZENS. THE CONSTITUTION STATES THAT THE PRESIDENT SHOULD BE PAID A "COMPENSATION" THAT CANNOT BE INCREASED OR DECREASED DURING A TERM. CONGRESS DETERMINES THE SALARY, WHICH INCREASED IN 2001 TO $400,000, DOUBLING THE SALARY THAT WAS SET BACK IN THE 1960S.
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1. power to command 2. Approve or Veto acts of Congress 3. Conference Committee Action 4. Grant power Presidential Power
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+ How bills become laws 1. A Bill Is Born 2. Committee Action 3. Subcommittee Review 4. Mark up 5. Committee Action to Report a Bill
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1.Voting 2.Referral to Other Chamber 3.Conference Committee Action 4.Final Action 5.Overriding a Veto Cont. How bills become laws
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Cont. How bills become laws
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  • Fall '15
  • Separation of Powers, President of the United States, United States Congress

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