2nd Installment of Reading Summaries

Golden door silver screen matthew fry jacobson the

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“Golden Door, Silver Screen” – Matthew Fry Jacobson The author’s main argument is to explain how American film has shaped ethnicity in the United States through common themes of immigration. Jacobson first illustrates the iconography of immigration and how Hollywood shaped the national narrative of nation through common themes of immigration. The author refers to still-shot photographers and film revolving around Ellis Island and Plymouth Rock, which helped shape different myths of origins. Then Jacobson turns his attention to the ‘musical’ aspect of film that creates themes of ‘ethnic coupling’. The article addresses the post-Civil Rights period, proving how Hollywood film consistently made racial conflicts, further addressing ethnicity through immigration. Jacobson uses “Rocky” (Sylvester Stallone) as a prime example to the post-Civil Rights period. Jacobson’s claim among immigration and ethnicity is appropriate, as “Ethnicity has become the common currency in American film realism” (123).
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“Imperialist Nostalgia” – Renato Rosaldo Renato Rosaldo investigates the notion of imperialist nostalgia, and then relates it to a non-fictional story between an American lieutenant and the Ilongots. The author’s main argument in this article is to explain imperialist nostalgia with help of Lieutenant William Jones and Michelle Rosaldo. Rosaldo describes nostalgia through Greek terms as nostos = to return home and algia = a painful condition. Then he clarifies nostalgia as “a pose of innocent yearning both to capture people’s imaginations and to conceal its complicity with often brutal domination” (108). The author then turns his attention to William Jones, using him as evidence to support his theory of imperialist nostalgia. He uses this story by showing the imperialism shown throughout the early 1900’s of the Ilongots ultimately transformed them from savages to Christians, adopting many Western ideas. Michelle Rosaldo was living proof of nostalgia, as she found it painful to see the traditional culture vanishing although that was her original quest. Rosaldo claims “memories that evoke moods of imperialist nostalgia both reproduce and disrupt ideologies”, proving its inconsistencies of history. “Pocahontas Perplex: the Image of the Indian Women in American Culture” – Rayna Green In this reading, Rayna Green explores the Pocahontas story and links it the ‘New World’ or America. The author’s main argument is to explain how the image of Native American women constantly changes in America due to alterations in the mythical story and the way American society used Pocahontas throughout history. She explores the relationship between the Pocahontas story and the Indian woman in the American society, providing several of different perceptions. In one example, Green believes the ‘Princess’ becomes more American as she was
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adopted in the New World, which makes the Indian woman to be looked as a ‘Mother Figure’ and is notably positive. While the Princess’ darker sister, ‘Squaw’ is “a depersonalized object of
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  • Spring '12
  • AdriannaHernandez
  • Culture of the United States, Salman Rushdie, Michelle Rosaldo

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