to support your criteria considering it examines forms of oppression

To support your criteria considering it examines

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to support your criteria considering it examines forms of oppression, discrimination, and domination as they manifest themselves through diversity components. This includes multiple identities as race and ethnicity, immigration,refugee and tribal status, religion and spirituality, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, social class and mental or physical disabilities. (Crenshaw, 1989, Hancock, 2007, Hunt, Zajicek, Norris, & Hamilton,2009; Viruell-Fuentes, Miranda, & Abdulrahm, 2012) This approach to social works includes integrating the various diversity components and identities and approaching practices from a holistic point of view. An example will be a social worker would approach a client in the context of the client's family and with recognition of the person's race and ethnicity, religious and spiritual expression, social class,etc. Reply Quote Email Author Message Unread Mark as Unread Message Not Flagged Set Flag 1 month ago Vangerlena Smith RE: Discussion - Week 6 COLLAPSE Cultural competency is the first thing that comes to mind when I think about criteria of social work practice. Cultural competence is when a professional is able to serve or work with a diverse group or individual and not cross any cultural boundaries, (Robbins, Chatterjee ,& Canda, 2014, p.157). It is
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important that one's is fluent in this area of social work because they could be presented with many situations that will require some knowledge of cultural competency. For a social worker, I think it will be important to remember that there are many factors that falls under cultural competence: gender identification, beliefs or religion, race, etc. Something here in Mississippi that has been a buzz is the LGBTIQ community. A bill has been passed that business owners could discriminate and refuse service, as it pertains to marriage of the LGBTIQ community, buying or getting things ready for their wedding. The south is a big bible belt, but if a social worker were to obtain a client who identify as part of the LGBTIQ; no matter how they were raised or what they believe they must not cross any cultural boundaries when servicing the client. I think the awareness of cultural competency is just a piece of what makes a social worker a professional; which takes me to my second criteria that defines competence, professionalism. This I find to be an ethical thin line for me. I have a missionary background, but thought it would be more practical to obtain a social work degree instead of a ministry degree. My missionary background causes me to sometimes think with my feelings, so to speak, and this could be seen as unprofessional or crossing ethical lines, so I often have to remind myself when working with my clients in the mental health field that my feelings are not going to help them. Reply Quote Email Author Hide 3 replies Message Unread Mark as Unread Message Not Flagged Set Flag 1 month ago Vangerlena Smith RE: Discussion - Week 6 COLLAPSE obbins, S. P., Chatterjee, P., & Canda, E. R. (2012).  Contemporary human behavior theory: A critical  perspective for social work  (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Allyn & Bacon.
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