Directions examine the documents on british power in

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Directions: Examine the documents on British power in India and annotate as you read by highlighting examples of methods that the British used to gain power in India in BLUE, examples of methods they used to consolidate their power in YELLOW, and examples of methods used to maintain power in GREEN. Document Set 1 The British used their military might and advanced technology to conquer and keep control of most parts of India. The British Indian Army was made up of roughly two-thirds Indian soldiers hired to defend the British East India Company and later the British government’s interests, and just one- third British soldiers. The British held the highest positions in the military. With the addition of the Maxim Gun, the first widely used machine gun, the military was nearly unstoppable. The gun could fire bullet after bullet without reloading and could swivel from side to side. British Indian Army soldiers, 1895. Image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is Public Domain
Illustration of British Indian Army soldiers and their British commander, 1896. Image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is Public Domain Maxim machine gun mounted on a Dundonald gun carriage, ca. 1890. Image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is Public Domain Document Set 2 An enduring monument to British imperialism in India is the Indian railway system, which at the time of independence in 1947 had more track mileage than that of any European state and less than only the United States, Canada, and the Soviet Union. The first railway track was laid in India in 1850, and by 1915 India had better than forty thousand miles of track and approximately one hundred million railroad passengers per year. Indian railway building was supported by several powerful groups: British cotton manufacturers, for whom railways were a cheap and efficient way to get cotton to the coast for shipment to England; British industrialists, who supplied India with most of its rails, locomotives, moving stock [railroad cars], and equipment; colonial officials, who saw railroads as a way to move troops quickly to trouble spots and an essential part of the Indian postal system; and millions of Indians, who, rather to the surprise of the British, took to rail travel with great alacrity [enthusiasm]…. Source: Andrea and Overfield, The Human Record: Sources of Global History, Houghton Mifflin from the NYS Global History and Geography Regents Exam, January 2012.
The first railway train on the East Indian Railway, 1854. The Illustrated London News. Image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is Public Domain Railroads Built During British Rule Source: Ashok K. Dutt et al., India in Maps, Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company (adapted) from the NYS Global History and Geography Regents Exam, June 2013. Document Set 3 In what is sometimes called the “Second Industrial Revolution,” telecommunications technology advanced in the mid-late 1800s and early 1900s. The telegraph was invented, making it possible to communicate with people far away in very little time. At first, these technologies were only used for governmental and commercial reasons. The telegraph was integral to British control in India. The British put up lines all over the country connecting their military posts so they

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