Dora also tells Alan about the white horses that are mentioned in the last book

Dora also tells alan about the white horses that are

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Dora also tells Alan about the white horses that are mentioned in the last book of the bible Revelations. The first horse is set apart from the others by being white and is known as the conqueror.Alan takes this information and sees Equus as not only the white horse but all horses. 2
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Stegall Alan even perceives himself to be the one riding the horse as they conquer each other's enemies. (70-71) “Tonight, we ride against them all.” Alan's decision of a horse as god is influenced by his father. Alan and his father didn't have a close relationship but he did consider what his father said and did. Frank tells Alan that TV is "a dangerous drug" (20) . He even said to Alan that "religion is the opium of people" (22) . Based on what Alan observes from his dad he believed that religion is the opium of people. When the Strang family went to the beach Frank tells a horseman, "In my opinion that is a dangerous horse" (36) . Accordingly, Alan starts to like the "dangerous" horse. Frank is also the same person who takes the photo of Christ from Alan's room. He gives Alan the photo of the horse which Alan hangs in the same exact place as a replacement for the other picture. By replacing the picture of the Jesus with the picture of the horse Alan believes that his father is saying to choose another religion. Despite the fact that Dysart would portray himself, Frank, and Dora as true of the religion of normal religions, he concludes this visually impaired and inert compliance from their current society.In Dysart's view, Alan's love of Equus is genuine love, and he sees the kid as fortunate to have the capacity to experience snapshots of total delight that Dysart has never and will never know. In old Greece, Alan's energy for Equus may be viewed as one of numerous approaches to communicate profoundly with the world. In current society, be that as it may, this sort of love is viewed as peculiar and wrong, and should be destroyed. Dysart understands that while it would be sound for Alan to have the capacity to carry on with an ordinary life, he can't consider anything more awful one can do to anyone than take away their religion. To Dysart and Shaffer the demise of enthusiasm and religion in any form of advancement influence destroys the human race. 3
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Stegall Dysart comprehends that Christianity does not offer the significant and individual love that Alan requires based on the information that Alan has provided from the few sessions that they have had. Dysart begrudges Alan's for being able to evoke the primitive Christian god. Dysart is unequipped for Alan’s religion that makes life comprehensible. For him the horse’s head is in a general sense unaccountable. Dysart in unequipped for Alan’s religion because he is unable to see past his own. As Dysart’s envy for Alan grows he begins to question his right to take Equus from Alan. Through the play monologues that are solemn and serious as Dysart laments his career and dissatisfaction for having to make alan normal. In fear that if he takes away Alan’s beliefs then he won't have any.
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