Socrates and nature according to aristophanes cloud

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Socrates and nature According to Aristophanes’ Cloud, Socrates refers to people who studies mechanics of nature as fools. Socrates seem to believe that nature was part of the divine which meant good intentions Socrates come from school of thought that believed examining of natural phenomena yields nothing practical. Aristophanes in his play the Cloud have Socrates meeting place burn down and it was clear that the audience did not cared whether Socrates burned with the place. Both Aristophanes and Platonic dialogues clearly indicated that Socrates was not politically active. Socrates did not spoke against or in favor of murderous Spartan-supported oligarchy. Specifically, Socrates during court proceeding admitted that he did not believe in the gods of the state. In addition, he further stated that he was not corrupting fellow Athenians intentionally. He asked the court to inform him which course of thought was correct for propagation instead of prosecuting him. Socrates of unjust speech Unjust speech is defined as unjustifiable, unmerited, underserved, biased, prejudiced, unfair, partial and inequitable speech. The analysis indicated that Socrates was perceived to use unjust speech when he failed to worship gods that were considered in the society as the most just and they worshipped with greater passion. Socrates speech was unjust because he talked against the
4 gods and things that were considered lawful in the society. During his prosecution, Socrates stood by believe by comparing the just and unjust speech. In the modern world it would be considered that his speech was just in the sense democracy allows individuals to express their ideas freely. But one may argued that Socrates corrupted the minds of Athens youth by making them to follow things that were not accepted in the society. Based on the analysis, Socrates was guilty of unjust speech because he refused to escape the execution simply because he believed that it is unjust to disobey laws. Considering that most of the jury did not wanted to commit Socrates into death penalty and they were in fact willing to send him in exile if Socrates had proposed counter-penalty. However, Socrates believed that

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