1970s and even hosted the worlds first punk festival

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1970s, and even hosted the world’s first punk festival in 1976, which featured bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Damned, Siouxsie and the Banshees, the Vibrators and the Subway Sect. 118 Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club and the Bull’s Head In October 1959, tenor saxophonists Ronnie Scott and Peter King joined forces to found what was to become one of the world’s most famous bebop venues. Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club opened in an underground room on Gerrard Street. From its opening, the club featured up-and-coming British jazz musicians alongside the American greats. The use of a local house band as support for visiting musicians ensured the interaction of British and American musicians, and helped to keep jazz in London fresh and innovative. John Fordham explains the attraction of a small jazz club for audiences: Fans loved the proximity to the guests, the way they would be ushered … through the parting crowd, up to the tiny stage to pick up one of Stan Tracey’s quirky, sidelong piano introductions. Local musicians liked the 117 Barroso. 118 Anonymous, (accessed 23 May 2011).
125 club as a place to meet friends, maybe stay on for an after-hours jam session. 119 The success of the club led to the need to expand the premises, and in 1965 the club moved to its current location at 47 Frith Street. Figures 12a and 12b show the two venues, and illustrate how Scott and King captured a similar atmosphere within the larger premises. Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club is set back from Frith Street. A small doorway opens onto a long corridor that leads past a cloakroom and ticket desk to the performance space. Despite being on street level, there are no windows, and the club is soundproof to the outside, with a ‘neat, dry acoustic’ inside.’ 120 Upstairs from the performance space is a private members’ bar (which sometimes showcases small-band gigs, or otherwise feeds the live music from the stage through the sound system), and downstairs is a green room for musicians and the toilets for patrons (to which music from the stage is also fed). The entrance to the main performance room faces the raised stage, with a bar and a few barstools to the right of the door, and a few square dining tables in front of the bar. To both sides are rows of bench-like seats that descend the few steps to another level of smaller round tables. The lighting is soft, and the floors and lightshades decorated in a warm red colour. The walls are decorated with signed pictures of musicians who have performed in the venue. This lengthy description of the interior of Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club (see Figure 13a and 13b for images of the exterior and interior in recent years) reveals that the 119 John Fordham, Ronnie Scott’s at Fifty (London: Palmgren Limited, 2009), 21. 120 Pete Long, telephone conversation with the author, 20 March 2008.
126 club is designed neither for a dancing audience, nor for a concert audience. The performance room is filled with tables and chairs for patrons, making dancing impossible even if the bebop performed allowed it. The venue was therefore

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