Example 2 15 List GPU resources associated with physical graphics adapter xe

Example 2 15 list gpu resources associated with

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Example 2-15. List GPU resources associated with physical graphics adapter # xe gpu-group-list vgpu A vgpu represents a virtual graphics adapter as defined by the graphics card. The vgpu-type-list command shown in Example 2-16 , returned three possiblevGPU options for the given host. Example 2-16. View the GPU types within a XenServer host # xe vgpu-type-list uuid ( RO) : ad32125b-e5b6-2894-9d16-1809f032c5bb vendor-name ( RO): NVIDIA Corporation model-name ( RO): GRID K100 framebuffer-size ( RO): 268435456 uuid ( RO) : ee22b661-4aa0-e6e6-5876-e316c3ea09fe vendor-name ( RO): NVIDIA Corporation model-name ( RO): GRID K140Q framebuffer-size ( RO): 1006632960 uuid ( RO) : 2025cc3e-c869-ef44-2757-a1994cc77c8e vendor-name ( RO): model-name ( RO): passthrough framebuffer-size ( RO): 0 Storage Objects From an architecture perspective, storage will consist of two concepts represented by four distinct objects. Each is uniquely identified and maintained within the XAPI database and are as follows: Storage repositories (SRs) are physical devices that will contain the virtual disks associated with a VM. • Physical block devices (PBDs) map physical server storage to a storage reposi‐ tory. • Virtual disk interfaces (VDIs) are virtual hard drives that leverage a storage- management API: keeping the disk type hidden to the VM, but transactions han‐ dled accordingly by the hypervisor. Virtual block disks (VBDs) map VDIs to virtual machines. The relationship between these four objects is shown in Figure 2-4 . XenServer Object Relationships | 27
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Figure 2-4. How XenServer storage objects relate to one another 28 | Chapter 2: Core Architecture and Critical Components
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CHAPTER 3 Installing XenServer The most important design decision you’ll need to make is defining the overall pur‐ pose for your XenServer installation. Many years ago, Citrix had a marketing cam‐ paign called “Ten minutes to Xen.” The core premise behind that campaign was that XenServer was so easy to install, a manual install could be completed in less than 10 minutes. This was a particularly interesting premise, considering that alternate plat‐ forms could easily take 10 minutes to simply collect configuration information, and it even prompted one analyst to arrive with a stop watch and slow-booting hardware to test the premise; and still the full install completed in less than 10 minutes. XenServer is a complete operating environment that is installed onto the target host’s local storage media. The installer does not support operating environment selection on boot (commonly known as dual-booting), and XenServer should be installed on a dedicated host. While there are frequent requests to install XenServer on removable Flash-based media, doing so should be avoided in order to preserve the lifespan of the media. Likewise for USB-based storage: do not install XenServer onto such media because it has been tested, tried, and presents extreme performance issues.
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