However immediately following the eagle we see

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However, immediately following "The Eagle," we see Momaday's "Comparatives." If you look at the first four lines, you will see alliteration from the consonant sounds of S and B:Sunlit sea,the drift of fronds,and bannersof bobbing boats—The repetition of the S and B consonant sounds here create not only alliteration, but euphony—pleasant sounds—as well. Additionally, while the F sound in "drift" is not at thebeginning of the word, it also creates alliteration with the F sound in "fronds."6. Assonance: a repetition of the same or similar vowel sounds can also add to the sound effects of a poem. This is usually not as obvious on the first reading. However, if you look back at the first four lines in "Comparatives," we can see upon closer examination a subtle effect from the O sounds in the words "fronds," bobbing," and "boats." These O sounds also contribute to the pleasant euphony of the poem.2.1. Rhyme: matching sounds in two or more words in a poem, usually at the ends of the lines (but not always).Tyger, tyger burning brightIn the forests of the nightAbove we see an example of both Perfect Rhyme and End Rhyme.A. Perfect rhyme: vowel and consonant sounds are the same (ight/ight).B. End rhyme: the rhyming words are at the ends of the lines (bright/night).We also see alliteration: "burning bright"C. On the other hand, some poets use Imperfect/Slant Rhyme.Emily Dickinson uses Imperfect/Slant Rhyme a great deal:I like to see it lap up the Miles—And lick the Valleys up—And stop to feed itself at Tanks—And then-- prodigious stepAround a Pile of mountains—
And supercilious peerIn Shanties—by the sides of Roads—And then a Quarry pare…Note the ends of lines 2 and 4 and 6 and 8. We see the words "up" and "step" contain the P consonant sound yet different vowel sounds. We also see the words"peer" and "pare" containing the P and R consonant sounds but different vowel sounds. This is what we meant by Imperfect or Slant Rhyme. Of course, we also see alliteration here with the P and R sounds. Yes, poems can have all sorts of different sound effects occurring at the same time, which often make the poem all that more enjoyable or memorable.D. Internal Rhyme occurs within the lines of poems:The Sun came up upon the left,Out of the sea came he!And he shone bright and on the rightWent down into the sea.We see here in line 2 the rhyming words "sea" and "he." In line 3 we see "bright" and "right." This is Internal Rhyme. Of course we also see End Rhyme in lines 2 and 4: "he" and "sea."E. Beginning rhyme occurs at the beginning of lines:Red river, red river,Slow flow heat is silenceNo will is still as a riverStill. Will heat moveWe see in lines 2 and 3 the Beginning Rhyme of "slow" and "no." Yet, we also see the Internal Rhyme in line 2 of "slow" and "flow" and in line 4 "still" and "will."F. Masculine Rhyme occurs when single syllables rhyme: can/ran, descend/contend. In fact, all of the above examples of rhyme we've looked at havebeen Masculine Rhyme.G. Feminine Rhyme occurs less frequently. It is a rhyme of two syllables: ocean/motion, sleeping/leaping.H. Rhyme Scheme: a chart of the rhyming sounds that appear at ends of lines. We assign a letter to the ends of the rhyming lines, and we match the letters to the lines that rhyme.Into the lower right (a)Square of the window frame (b)
There came (b)With scalloped flight (a)

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