In order to overcome the general claim that people

Info iconThis preview shows pages 6–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
in order to overcome the general claim that people ought to be able to marry whomever they choose. Exercise 12-9 The questions in this exercise have no “correct” answers. Exercise 12-10 The questions in this exercise have no “correct” answers. Exercise 12-11 ▲1. The harm principle: Shoplifting harms those from whom one steals. ▲2. The harm principle: Forgery tends to harm others. 3. Legal paternalism, for obvious reasons; but suicide often harms the family of the deceased, and thus one can also imagine an argument against some suicides based on the harm principle. ▲4. We think the offense principle is the most relevant, because the practice in question is found highly offensive by most people (at least we believe—and hope—so). But one might also include the harm principle, because spitting in public can spread disease-causing organisms. 5. Legal paternalism; harm principle. Obviously, one runs the risk of doing harm both to oneself and others by driving under the influence. IM – 12 | 6
Background image of page 6

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
▲6. Legal moralism, because many people find adultery immoral; and, to a lesser extent, both the harm principle and legal paternalism, because adultery can increase the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. 7. The offense principle, since same-sex marriages are offensive to some people; and legal moralism, since some people believe that homosexuality is immoral. A few writers have tried to make a case based on the harm principle, but we’ve not seen any very good efforts to date. 8. Legal paternalism. The reasoning is that such laws prevent a person from seeking, or at least from finding, medical treatment that might be incompetent. (Justifications of laws that forbid one group from doing something in order to protect another group from doing something to itself are sometimes said to be based on “impure” paternalism. In the “pure” variety, the group restrained is the same group being protected.) 9. Same sort of answer as the one to question 5. ▲10. The offense principle. 11. The harm principle. Trespassers may damage the property on which they trespass. (Of course, it may also be that a property owner is offended by an uninvited person crossing or camping out on his or her property.) 12. Mainly justified on grounds of offense, we think. But moralism is also available: It is immoral to cause pain to a creature that can feel pain; torturing a pet causes such pain. Therefore torturing a pet is immoral. Therefore torturing a pet should be prohibited by law. Exercise 12-12 This is an in-class or writing exercise. Exercise 12-13 This exercise asks the student to construct an argument. Exercise 12-14 1. a. Principle 4 b. Principle 2 Compatible 2. a. Principle 3 b. Principle 7 Incompatible 3. a. Principle 1 b. Principle 5 Compatible IM – 12 | 7
Background image of page 7
4. a. Principle 5 b. Principle 2 Compatible 5. a. Principle 8 b. Principle 6 Incompatible Exercise 12-15 1. Relevant on Principle 7 2. Relevant on Principle 1 3. Relevant on Principle 6 4. Relevant on Principle 1 5. Irrelevant 6. Irrelevant 7. Relevant on Principle 3
Background image of page 8

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page6 / 9

in order to overcome the general claim that people ought to...

This preview shows document pages 6 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online