Teaching others doesnt need to be formal lessons you

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Teaching others doesn’t need to be formal lessons: you could bring up the points you recently read at a dinner party and see if you can explain it in a sufficiently clear manner. You could teach through writing blog articles, earning yourself reputation as a domain expert, or teach through internal company training documents, adding value to your company. 3 Rephrase for understanding This short tip applies when you have a teacher or mentor. After your teacher explains something ask them to listen to you rephrase what they’ve just taught you in your own words. Your teacher then listens to your rewording and checks whether or not you have a correct understanding. Not only does this technique turn your teacher-mediated learning into a more “active” exercise as compared to “passive” —and quickly forgotten—intake, but it also helps your teacher determine whether you’ve understood the concepts. Without it, they are limited to relying on your poorly hidden facial expressions of confusion and on any later blunders they notice you committing. Part F: Ancillary Ideas 1 Learning takes way longer than you expect, but its scope is often further reaching Much to my dismay, nearly everything I’ve ever begun learning required an investment of three-up-to-infinity times longer than I’d initially anticipated. I say “infinity” because, despite months of toil in some topics, I still haven’t remotely conquered the basics. I blame my unreasonable expectations about fast learning on the unbelievable amount of suspect advice touted in self-improvement blogs/products. Read at double your speed while retaining similar comprehension after only six weeks with our shiny new app? I don’t think so.
Any speed reader I’ve met in real life gained the skill through reading four to twelve hours per day for a decade. (I’m envious enough of the skill to always inquire when I meet a fast reader.) This goes to show that the community reviewing and recommending these self-improvement products can’t always be trusted, and I suspect they perpetuate misinformation like this not just to sell products but also because they wish to appear smart. When some jackass claims something like “I learned programming in 4 weeks” the hidden assumption they want to goad you into believing is “because I’m sooo much smarter than normal folk”. Negativity aside, the long term benefits of learning have astounded me—both in material benefit and in the general applicability of insights I’ve gained. Regarding material benefit, reading an e-book introduction to the Ruby programming language while my flight was delayed culminated in years of passive income through a website I later programmed. Taking Spanish classes during my gap year resulted in my helping set up a newspaper in Bolivia . As for general applicability of insights, let me explain through showing that knowledge of grammar makes you funnier. In an episode of the 90s sitcom Friends , Monica sees a photo in a newspaper of her friend Rachel’s ex-boyfriend’s attractive new partner. Monica: Wow! She is pretty… *(realising that her friend Rachel will be offended by her ex

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