The middle class quickly began to rise as the poor began to accumulate the

The middle class quickly began to rise as the poor

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better working conditions. The middle class quickly began to rise as the poor began to accumulate the wealth of those who had died. This all plays a part in today’s society, where the middle class is more commonly seen as the most populated of classes. It just continued developing over the centuries and is now a huge role in the world today. Social classes haven’t been the same since the Black Death. The ways in which religion was viewed was drastically changed after the Plague hit Western Europe, Africa, and Asia. During the outbreaks of this disease, the vast majority of the population believe that God was punishing humanity for its sins. Good priests, who would stay to help the dying and perform funerals, often times obtained the disease due to being so close to the infected. The bad priests, however, would run away or hide in order to save themselves from being one of the many who would contract the plague. Some people had given up on God altogether. Dr. L. Kip Wheeler stated in his article, “The Black Plague: The Least You Need to Know,” that, “Others despaired, and wrote that God did not exist, or that He had died, or He was asleep, or He had given up on humanity. Europe did not regain a sense of optimism and hope until the Renaissance of the late 1500s.” 1 People distrusted God and the church, and there was a brief period of time where religion wasn’t something that was thought about. Religion and the 1 "Black Plague: The Least You Need to Know - Cn." . Accessed 15 Dec. 2018.
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Taylor Cuskaden Final: Bubonic Plague Mr. Soleim English Church were reformed into ideas that were more logical and effective. Over the years, religion has been changed drastically into a more modern belief, and it’s all because of the Plague. The Bubonic Plague led to fighting among the societies that were affected. There was especially an increase of hatred and targeting towards the Jewish, simply because they were least affected by the Plague. They were often housed far away from where the rats dwelled, and they also had strict hygiene and dietary laws. Because Jews weren’t hit as hard by this disease, their Christian neighbors accused the Jews of poisoning wells to kill the Christians. Purges against the Jewish took place in 1349, as well as nearly every other year of a plague outbreak. In the article “How the Black Death Changed the World,” Heather Whipps states: “This prejudice was nothing new in Europe at the time, but intensified during the Black Death and led many Jews to flee east to Poland and Russia, where they remained in large numbers until the 20th-century.” 2 Not only
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