However the colonists in north carolina refused to

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would be economically rewarding for them to accept the Stamp Act. However, the colonists in North Carolina refused to accept the Stamp Act and stood behind their fellow colonists. This not only shows solidarity between the colonies but it also shows that they all share a similar ideology. That being said, a shifting ideology was not the only cause of the revolution. For instance, Gary Nash says that “Everyone, with the possible exception of a handful of ascetic 7 Edmund Morgan & Helen Morgan, The Stamp Act Crisis, (University of North Carolina Press, 1962), pg. 171
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James Francis Revolutionary America recluses, has economic interests.” 8 The wealthy people in places like Boston inarguably economic interests. Boston, at the time, was in a depression and the wealthy wouldn’t want to see their wealth dwindle away because of an unconstitutional tax. Nash also states in the same paragraph that the above quote came from that “Ideological principles and economic interests were intimately conjoined.” 9 This quote shows that in the American colonies both ideologies and economics were origins of the revolutions. Christie thinks that the fault lies with the British government and, this too can be correct. While there was, undoubtedly, a standoff between the colonies and the British regarding parliamentary authority and rights, had the British acquiesced a little bit and assured the colonists of their rights and liberties as Englishmen then war might have been avoided. The “Declaration of the Stamp Act Congress” document proves that it was all three arguments because all three arguments are present in the document. Rights and Ideology (Morgan) are shown in the 2 nd point when the Congress writes of “Inherent rights and privileges.” Economic concerns in the colonies (Nash) are expressed in the 11 th point when the Congress writes that the colonies will be “unable to purchase the manufactures of Great Britain.” The overreaching of Great Britain and their failure to recognize the Americans concerns (Christie) are shown in the 8 th point when the Congress writes that parliament has “extended the jurisdiction of the courts of admiralty beyond their ancient limits.” 10 The American Revolution was one of the most complex eras in history, it is no wonder then that one point of view could not suffice. Ultimately no one argument is or was the sole cause of the American Revolution even though each author by themselves makes a very compelling argument. Instead, the origins of the American Revolution most likely lie in some conglomeration of the three authors’ arguments. 8 Gary B. Nash, The Urban Crucible, (Harvard University Press, 1979), pg. 200 9 Gary B. Nash, The Urban Crucible, (Harvard University Press, 1979), pg. 200 10 Jack P. Green, Colonies to Nation 1763-1789 , (1967), page 64
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James Francis Revolutionary America
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