Urban development and the environment vehicular and

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Urban development and the environment Vehicular and industrial emissions and poorly ventilated house hold stoves also inflate the tremendously high environmental costs of urban crowding. Lost productivity of ill or diseased workers, contamination of existing waster sources, and destruction of infrastructure, increased fuel expenses incurred by people’s having to boil unsafe water, worsen at faster rate than urban population size increase, with the result that the marginal environmental cost of additional residents rises. The global environment and economy Most cumulative environmental destruction to date has been caused by the developed world. However, with high fertility rates, rising average incomes, and increasing greenhouse gas emissions in the developing world, this pattern is likely to reverse sometimes in this century. It is thus unclear how the costs of global reform should be divided. Nature and pace of Greenhouse Gas-induced climate change t he impacts of global warming are likely to be felt earlier than expected and that the windown within which very larege future costs can be averted in beginning to close. The developed countries will have to take the lead and bear most of the costs in funding both remediation and adaptation, but developing countries will also need to play a significant role in limiting global warming to safeguard their own futures. Natural Resource-based livelihoods as a pathway out of poverty in developing countries, much natural resource exploitation has been locally unsustainable and has occurred in a manner and on a scale that often bypasses the poor. Governments may grant or allow foreign or national companies’ logging, fishing and mining, without regard to the people who depend on these lands and resources for their livelihoods and way of life Sustainable development and environment accounting The Scope of Environmental Degradation: An Overview 2
Environmental degradation h related consequences on health and productivity The principal health and productively consequences of environmental damage include water pollution and scarcity, air pollution, solid and hazardous wastes, soil degradation, deforestation, loss of biodiversity, and global warming-caused climate change. The burning of biomass fuels such as wood, straw, manure, create dangerously high levels of indoor pollution to which 400 million to 700 million people,mostly women and childen. Rural Development and Environment: A Tale of Two Villages o Representative African village Located in a semiarid landscape, have been warned by international experts that cutting the remaining trees and cultivating marginal land will only worsen the hard ships that they already endure.

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