3 demonstrate the same command again and act it out

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3. Demonstrate the same command again and act it out yourself. 4. First give one command at a time, then later combine instructions. 5. Send children all over the room. Phase 5 1. This phase includes TPR in the daily activities, involving the whole learning programme. 2. Guideline 1 – use the method of TPR in your content subjects or use the vocabulary and ideas from content subjects during your English lesson. 3. Guideline 2 – Use objects, pictures, verbs to teach the new language. 4. Focus on verbs. Phase 6 1. Now start using the 2 nd language. 2. Work in pairs – children have listened to commands and performed actions. 3. Give them enough opportunity to try out some new commands. 4. Let children work in pairs and use the commands on their partners. 5. Teacher should pose questions, pause for all the children to formulate an answer. 6. Name a child to answer the question 7. Teacher should never – answer the question themselves, allow children to snap their fingers, raise their hands or call out “Ma’am, Ma’am”, ask the same few children all the time. 8. Explaing the educator’s role using this approach. (9) Oct2012, Oct 2011, jan 2011 (Pg 20-21) 1. Gather materials indicated for each lesson 2. Give the instruction to the entire class, modeling the performances 3. Repeat, varying the order of instructions, and continue to model the performance. 4. Repeat the instructions a third time, without modeling, allowing learners to copy others learners. Praise the learners when they react correctly. 5. Select small groups of learners when they react correctly 6. Call on individual volunteers to act out the instructions. The idea is to keep the anxiety low with a ‘no failure’ activity, yet still challenge the children. 7. On the second day, repeat the lesson, allowing children to carry out the instructions. 8. Praise children for correct reactions. Introduce new directions while you model the actions. 9. Each day review segments from previous lessons, combining them with new material. 10. Use vocabulary that children need in their immediate environment. 11. Create your own TPR drills to introduce or reinforce any new topic – adjectives, comparisons, clauses and compound sentences. E.G., “Go to the tallest boy.” “Bring me the book with the most pages.” “Point to the girl who is wearing a pink ribbon.” Indicating how the approach is focused on assisting the learner to overcome the barriers to second language acquisition. Pg 23 Oct 2011 (8), Oct2012 (10), Jan2011(10) 1. TPR focuses on the reduction of tension It focuses on activities that allow learners to experiment with different ways of expressing meaning without tension. Use of language games and other enjoyable language learning activities avoids anxiety, stress and tension in children, caused by a fear of failure, ridicule or making mistakes.
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