MSL101L04 Basic Map Reading SR.pdf lesson 4.pdf

The contour lines depicting a draw are u shaped or v

Info icon This preview shows pages 56–60. Sign up to view the full content.

The contour lines depicting a draw are U-shaped or V-shaped, pointing toward high ground. (See Figure 9-21.)
Image of page 56

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Elevation and Relief 15 November 2013 TC 3-25.26 9-15 Figure 9-21. Draw 9-34. A spur is a short, continuous sloping line of higher ground normally jutting out from the side of a ridge. A spur is often formed by two roughly parallel streams cutting draws down the side of a ridge. The ground slopes down in three directions and up in one. Contour lines on a map depict a spur with the U or V pointing away from high ground. (See Figure 9-22.) Figure 9-22. Spur
Image of page 57
Chapter 9 9-16 TC 3-25.26 15 November 2013 9-35. A cliff is a vertical or near-vertical feature that is an abrupt change of the land. When a slope is so steep that the contour lines converge into one “carrying” contour of contours, this last contour line has tick marks pointing toward low ground. (See Figure 9-23, A.) Cliffs are also shown by contour lines very close together and, in some instances, touching each other. (See Figure 9-23, B.) Figure 9-23, A. Cliff (with tick marks) Figure 9-23, B. Cliff (without tick marks) S UPPLEMENTARY T ERRAIN F EATURES 9-36. Supplementary terrain features include cuts and fills. A cut is a man-made feature resulting from cutting through raised ground, usually to form a level bed for a road or railroad track. Cuts are shown on a map when they are at least 10 feet high, and they are drawn with a contour line along the cut line. This contour line extends the length of the cut and has tick marks that extend from the cut line to the roadbed, if the map scale permits this level of detail. (See Figure 9-24.)
Image of page 58

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Elevation and Relief 15 November 2013 TC 3-25.26 9-17 9-37. A fill is a man-made feature resulting from filling a low area, usually to form a level bed for a road or railroad track. Fills are shown on a map when they are at least 10 feet high, and they are drawn with a contour line along the fill line. This contour line extends the length of the filled area and has tick marks that point toward lower ground. If the map scale permits, the length of the fill tick marks are drawn to scale and extend from the base line of the fill symbol. (See Figure 9-24.) Figure 9-24. Cut and fill INTERPRETATION OF TERRAIN FEATURES 9-38. Terrain features do not normally stand alone. To better understand these when they are depicted on a map, they need to be interpreted correctly. These terrain features (see Figure 9-25) are interpreted by using contour lines; the shape, orientation, size, elevation, and slope approach; ridgelining; or streamlining. Figure 9-25. Terrain features
Image of page 59
This page intentionally left blank .
Image of page 60
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Fall '16
  • Cartography, Geographic coordinate system, Topographic map, Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern