Acharyas constructivist interpretation of the asean

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Acharya’s constructivist interpretation of the “ASEAN Way” as the basis of ASEAN security community o Security communities differ from security regimes where a process of inter-state socialization leads to a complete and long-term convergence of interests between members in the avoidance of war 5. What is the theoretical spectrum discussed in class (Balance of Power, Hedged Engagement, Accommodation, and Bandwagoning)? Provide examples of each concept in regards to Pacific Rim states. Theoretical spectrum o Balance of power In IR most popular
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Great powers align with lesser powers o Hedged engagement Adopted by small/middle states o Accommodation/reconciliatory Adopted by small/middle states o Bandwagoning In IR most popular If you can mutualize a threat, then you bandwagon it Balance of power o Perceive China’s material growth as a threat. o Fear China’s military buildup, which caused the power disparity between South Korea. o Fear China’s close relations with North Korea. o Seek to increase its own military buildup, modernization, and procurement (internal balancing). o Strengthen its military alliance with the United States (external balancing) Bandwagoning o South Korea would align itself with the threatening state (China) in order to either neutralize the threat or benefit from the threatening states. o To put it simply, “if you cannot beat them, join them,” but fear or threat remains present. Hedging strategy o A secondary state fear and distrust a larger state’s long-term intention although the latter does not pose immediate threat to the former.
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o It does not seek to balance against a larger state, but undertake other policy venues—diversification or multidirectional policy. Accommodation/reconciliatory behavior o A secondary state does not fear a larger state, and therefore does not hedge, or balance against a larger state. It accommodates, but does not bandwagon with the larger state either. (Kang) o How different is it from bandwagoning? The difference is that a state is not aligned with or “kowtow” a larger state because it conducts its foreign policy independent from a larger state’s interference. Enmeshment o “Enmeshment” (Goh) refers to “the process of engaging with a state so as to draw it into deeper involvement in international or regional society, enveloping it in a web of sustain exchanges and relationships, with the longer-term aim of integration.” o In the process the target states’ interests are redefined, and its identity possibly altered.” 6. How has ASEAN changed state relationships in the Pacific Rim? What strategies have been implemented to secure its role as a viable player in regional politics and what are some of the challenges ASEAN faces with these objectives?
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