John browns raid on harpers ferry virginia 1859 john

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John Brown's Raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia (1859). John Brown was a radical abolitionist who had earlier murdered pro-slavery men in Kansas. On October 16, 1859, Brown and 22 other men (some of them black), attacked the federal armory at Harper's Ferry with the idea of getting arms and using these arms for a general slave uprising. The raid failed, Brown was captured, tried by a Virginia court, and executed. To many in the North, Brown was a martyr, to the South, Brown was an example of the lengths the North would go to destroy slavery and the southern way of life. The Election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency in 1860. The Democratic party split over the issue of slavery. The Southern Democrats nominated John C. Breckiuridge of KY. He ran on a platform of supporting the Dred Scott decision and a federal slave code. The Northern Democrats nominated Stephen Douglas. The Republican party had been formed in 1854 by northern Whigs who realized that their party had been killed by Kansas-Nebraska. The Know-Nothings, a secret anti-immigrant group, also played a large role in forming the party. The Republican platform supported the transcontinental railroad, a Homestead Act, a high protective tariff, and the non-expansion of slavery; including the repeal of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. The Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln who was an ex-Whig, and the richest trial lawyer in TIL Lincoln had gained fame when he ran against Douglas for the Senate in 1858. Representatives from the border states sought a compromise and formed their own party, the Constitutional-Union party, and nominated John Bell of TN. Lincoln won the election with only 39% of the popular vote--the smallest percentage in history. In the south, Bell and Breckenridge received 85% of the popular vote; Lincoln was not even on the ballot in some southern states. In the North, Lincoln and Douglas received 86% of the popular vote. Lincoln received 180 Electoral votes, Douglas 12, Breckiuridge 76, and Bell 39. Thus, the polarization of the nation was complete. m. Why the South Seceded from the Union and Why the North Objected to Secession. ... 5/22/2003
Civil War & Reconstruction [lec] Page 7 of 18 After his election Lincoln supported a constitutional amendment that would guarantee the protection of slavery in the states where it already existed against any further interference by the federal government. This amendment could not be repealed. Lincoln though, was very clear that he would allow no further expansion of slavery. This compromise was not acceptable to the South. Lincoln was elected on November 6, by February 22, seven states had left the Union, set up their own nation--the Confederate States of America--and elected Jefferson Davis their fIrst president.

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