other animal admirable in form and movement and godlike in capability of

Other animal admirable in form and movement and

This preview shows page 6 - 9 out of 16 pages.

other animal, admirable in form and movement, and godlike in capability of understanding. He basically is stating that humans are the perfect addition to the world. Yet, Hamlet sees them as worthless. He refers to men as dust, claiming that is not delighted by men or women. Since Hamlet is trapped in his mind most of the time, he is unable to appreciate the good in humanity. Although he acknowledges the great capability of humans, they do not move him. He focuses on the negative qualities men obtain: such as lying, cheating, deceiving, and revenging. Hamlet’s perception is ultimately blinded by his grief, so he cannot look at the beauty of the world.
ACT 3What does it mean to hold the mirror up to nature? What are the ways we learn to see ourselves more clearly?Holding a mirror up to nature allows a person to reflect on the reality of the situation. The mirror is controversial because it cannot lie; it cannot deceive because it only reflects. Yet, holding a mirror up is a slightly different perspective because seeing things backwards can slightly illuminate alternate realities. The way to gain greater self-awareness is through your own moral conscious and gut feeling, as well through how others perceive you.Claudius gains the ability to see himself more clearly after viewing Hamlet’s
perception of Claudius through the play. He ultimately acknowledges his feelings of anger and blame, towards Hamlet’s madness, are a direct result of the guilt he feels for the murder. Claudius reveals in his soliloquy, “My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent,” indicating he regrets his crime (3.3.44). Although Claudius lacks the remorse after the murder, his confidence is starting to deteriorate as a result of his conscious. He cannot escape his crime, especially after seeing it through a mirrored image during the play. This is the first time the reader/ viewer sees Claudius truly addresses his guilt. It seems that Claudius is forced to face his conscious and is overwhelmed by the reality of his situation. He cannot gain redemption for the murder and still reap his rewards. Ultimately the mirror showed Claudius he must give up his power to begin to repent. Claudius took so long to feel the weight of his crime because he was constantly running away from it. Since he thought no one else was aware of his murder, he could reap the benefits of the crime. Now that he knows his secret is no longer safe, he begins to worry. Claudius saw his murder in a new way once it was reflected back to him. Before his intentions exceeded his guilt, but now he realizes nothing can provide remedy. Claudius was blinded by his own distorted perception of power to see the reality of his actions and to feel the guilt. I am still contemplating on what Claudius feels guilt for. He expresses no remorse for the loss of his brother; he seems to be feeling guilty just because he knows murder is a crime, and crime is wrong. Although the mirrored image the play

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture