In the camp unicef provides child friendly spaces

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and walked long hours with their families to reach safety. In the camp, UNICEF provides child-friendly spaces, schools, and vaccination facilities. Behn and Touma note that when they arrived, “the children rushed towards us, held our hands, and did not stop talking.” Here is one of their stories. Haitham, 12, said he had not been in school for almost two years. “The only school I could go to was a Daesh school,” he said, using the local term for the so-called Islamic State. “They only wanted to teach us how to use guns,” he continued, pretending to shoot with his hands. “But I didn’t want to. I don’t want to use guns, I don’t like guns.” All he wanted, Haitham said, was to go back to a normal school. Other children in the camp echoed Haitham’s saddening experiences, but also his resolve and resilience. These children fight to preserve their childhoods as best they can and refuse to give in to the suffering and repression ISIS has spread to the region (see Sirin & Rogers-Sirin, 2015; UNICEF, 2015, 2016d; for detailed discussion of the growing crisis of refugee and immigrant children around the world). Alice Fothergill and Lori Peck’s Children of Katrina (2015) is a highly engaging longitudinal ethnography of children, youth, and their families’ recovery from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. Globally, children make up nearly 50 percent of those who are affected by disasters, and the risks are growing. Overwhelming evidence suggests that climate change will lead to more frequent and severe weather-related disasters in the immediate future. As a result, more children will be exposed to floods, droughts, windstorms, heat waves, and other extreme events. (2015, p. 21). The main purpose of the book was to fill a gap in the research on disas- ters and recovery from disasters by focusing on the perspectives and real life experiences of children and youth. The authors closely examine the capacities of young people and describe the many ways that they contrib- uted to their own and to other’s recovery. In doing so, they go beyond the concept of individual resiliency to argue for the importance of variations in macro structural factors and how children, youth, and adults collectively act as competent social agents to confront constraining social factors and make effective use of enabling ones. In particular, they demonstrate the agency of children and youth to contribute to the recovery process of adults in their lives, other children, and themselves. The authors support (Continued) Copyright ©2018 by SAGE Publications, Inc. This work may not be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means without express written permission of the publisher. Draft Proof - Do not copy, post, or distribute
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354 PART FOUR: Children, Social Problems, and the Future of Childhood their interpretations with rich ethnographic and interview data, children’s drawings, and strong interpretive narratives. Their stories of the families they studied were full of both heartbreak and inspiration as some children found equilibrium and stability, others fluctuated back and forth between
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