operating at the time Scott viewed them as incapable of properly assimilating

Operating at the time scott viewed them as incapable

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operating at the time, Scott viewed them as incapable of properly assimilating Indigenous students into Christian culture, as their families would have retained a significant amount of cultural influence over them (Milloy, 2017). Throughout the 1920s, the Canadian government continued to heavily subsidize residential schools, whilst the administration and education of the schools were left at the hands of various Church organizations (Millloy, 2017). Despite the government’s financial support of these institutions, the awful conditions at many residential schools demonstrated the degree to which they were being underfunded. Indian residential schools were often overcrowded far beyond the schools’ capacities, which led to detrimental consequences for the students (Bryce, 1922). First and foremost, overcrowded classrooms reduced the overall quality of education at the majority of residential schools. Second, inadequate funding meant that students were often underfed and malnourished. Finally, the lack of basic sanitary standards in these schools, in addition to student’s malnourishment and minimal access to medical care, resulted in the deathly spread of diseases throughout these schools (Bryce, 1922). Dr. Peter Bryce was commissioned by the Department of Indian affairs in the early twentieth century to write a report on the quality of healthcare within Canadian residential schools. He commented on the horrific conditions of medical services and sanitation at these schools between 1904 and 1922. Dr. Bryce attributed the rapid spread of diseases, such as tuberculosis and the Spanish flu, to the federal government's negligence in their administration of these schools (Bryce, 1922). This constitutes one of the many reasons behind the rationalization of Canada’s IRS system as a mechanism of cultural genocide.
Although the Canadian government never published Dr. Bryce’s report, he released it himself in 1922 as “The Story of a National Crime: Being a Record of the Health Conditions of the Indians of Canada from 1904 to 1921”. In his review of 35 Residential schools between 1907 and 1914, Dr. Bryce estimated that nearly 25 percent of all students had died of various diseases (Bryce, 1922). Furthermore, numerous fires at residential schools led to a greater loss of students' lives, many of which could have been prevented if the schools had installed fire escapes and sprinklers (Milloy, 2017). Dr. Bryce’s report provides a substantial amount of evidence that infrastructural inadequacies of Residential Schools directly resulted in the untimely deaths of thousands of Indigenous youths throughout the 20th century. Even Duncan Campbell Scott concurred that “fifty percent of children who passed through these schools did not live to benefit from the education they had received therein” (Milloy, 2017). Although the death toll in the IRS system alone illustrates the atrocities that were committed by the Canadian government and Chrisitan organizations, the repercussions of the IRS system have gone far beyond this. The loss

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