Working it and re titling it the finished product

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working it and re-titling it, the finished product, known asUncle Vanya, propelledChekhov's success and fame in his own life and to this day.In 1896, Chekhov entered the period of creativity for which he is best known. At the turnof the century, he authored four plays, commentaries on Russian society, which havegained him lasting acclaim:The Sea Gullin 1896,Uncle Vanyain 1896,The Three Sistersin1901, andThe Cherry Orchard, his last great play, in 1904. These four works present a
School of Distance EducationPerspective on LiteraturePage 14challenge to the acting ensemble as well as to audiences, because in place of conventionalaction Chekhov offers a "theatre of mood" and a "submerged life in the text."Chekhovmarried Olga Knipper, a former protégée, who performed in each of these four plays, in1901.The Cherry Orchardwas first performed in Moscow on January 17, 1904, Chekhov'slast birthday, with his wife in the leading role. Chekhov died of pulmonary tuberculosison July second of that year, in Germany.Most of Chekhov’s tales are written between 1885 and 1899 which was his most creativeperiod as a short story writer. Chekhov’s best short stories are held in high esteem bywriters and critics in which he made formal innovations that have influenced theevolution of the modern short story. His originality consists in an early use of the stream-of-consciousness technique, later adopted by James Joyce and other modernists, combinedwith a disavowal of the moral finality of traditional story structure. He made no apologiesfor the difficulties this posed to readers, insisting that the role of an artist was to askquestions, not to answer them.His stories have influenced a host of writers right from James Joyce to KatherineMansfield. He builds a low-toned atmosphere out of petty patches of brightly colouredpersonalities. His heroes are individuals struggling with an optimistic approach but at themercy of irresistible forces. His stories present a convincing picture of the Russian middle-class life at the end of the 19thcentury but they have a timelessquality since they reflect theuniversal predicament of man.INTRODUCTIONAs a writer of short fiction, Chekhov is indebted to such literary giants as Maupassant,Tolstoy, and Turgenev, but his own influence on western literature has been immense.The author's masterful handling of prose, as well as his sensitivity towards character,mood, and setting, impressed authors as diverse as E. M. Forster and Virginia Woolf.Chekhov, in his stories, weaves humor with pathos to magnify the inconsequential detailsof people's lives. He also developed a technique of ending stories with what have beentermed "zero endings"—or anti-climactic conclusions. This technique makes the storiesseem more realistic, and often more pathetic, because readers are left to guess what willhappen next. However, Chekhov also employs "surprise endings" to confound ourexpectations, and we can never be sure how a tale will end. Consequently, over a hundred

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