This level of physical activity is higher than that documented in the 2001 NHS

This level of physical activity is higher than that

This preview shows page 23 - 25 out of 88 pages.

previous 12 months. This level of physical activity is higher than that documented in the 2001 NHS, in which 71% of Indigenous people and 68% of non-Indigenous people aged 15 years or older reported being sedentary or practising low levels of exercise.
Image of page 23
CHCDIV002 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people cultural safety (Learning Materials) TRED® College 17 Khartoum Road, Macquarie Park NSW 2113 Australia +61 2 9870 7688 [email protected] RTO ID 40797 BODYWEIGHT Body mass index (BMI weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in metres) is the usual measure for classifying a person’s weight for height. Being overweight (BMI between 25 to 29.9) or obese (BM I >= 30) increases a person’s risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, respiratory diseases, renal disease, certain cancers, osteoarthritis, pregnancy complications, and psychosocial problems. A high BMI can be a result of poor nutrition, physical inactivity, socioeconomic disadvantage, genetic predisposition, increased age, and alcohol and tobacco use According to the 2001 NHS, the age-adjusted prevalence of overweight among Indigenous respondents aged 18 years and over living in non-remote areas was 64% compared with 50% for non-Indigenous people. Indigenous people were nearly twice as likely to be obese than other Australians: 31% compared with 16%. IMMUNISATION In response to the greater burden of communicable diseases among Indigenous people, the NHMRC has endorsed a series of special guidelines and schedules for immunisation of vaccine- preventable diseases, which include some extra vaccinations. According to the 2001 NHS, full immunisation coverage for Indigenous children under 7 years of age was generally lower than that for non-Indigenous children in non-remote areas. BREASTFEEDING Breast milk, which is the natural and optimum food for babies, contains proteins, fats and carbohydrates at levels that are appropriate for an infant's metabolic capacities and growth requirements. It also has anti-infective properties and contains immunoglobulins which provide some immunity against early childhood diseases. Surveys indicate that a majority of Indigenous women breastfeed their babies. According to the 2001 NHS, 77% of Indigenous children aged less than 4 years living in non- remote areas were reported to have been breastfed for at least some period. This level is slightly lower than the 87% of non-Indigenous children aged less than 4 years who had been breastfed. On the other hand, mothers of Indigenous children reported in the WAACHS that they were more likely to initiate breastfeeding and breastfeed for longer than mothers in the general population, particularly those living in more isolated areas. TOBACCO SMOKING Smoking tobacco increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, some cancers, lung diseases, and a variety of other health conditions. Passive smoking is also of concern to health, with children particularly susceptible. Surveys consistently reveal that the prevalence of smoking is higher among Indigenous people than among non-Indigenous people. The 2001 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, for example, found that 45% of Indigenous people aged 14 years or older smoked daily - more than twice the proportion of their non-Indigenous counterparts
Image of page 24
Image of page 25

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture