However comparing historical safety record of civilian nuclear energy with

However comparing historical safety record of

This preview shows page 30 - 35 out of 61 pages.

However, comparing historical safety record of civilian nuclear energy with other forms of electrical generation found that during the period from 1970-1992 there were 39 on-the-job deaths of nuclear power plant workers 6,400 on-the-job deaths of coal power plant workers 1,200 on-the-job deaths of natural gas power plant workers Coal power plants are estimated to kill 24,000 Americans per year due to lung disease, and average coal power plant emits ~100 times as much radiation/year (in form of toxic coal waste known as fly ash).
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Lecture 17 Nuclear Energy: Past and Future [6] Waste from nuclear energy is extremely dangerous and it has to be carefully stored for ~10,000 years according to U.S. EPA. The industry s remaining and most intractable problem is what to do with spent nuclear fuel, which has not been solved. The government was supposed to begin accepting spent fuel for burial in 1998 but now says it will be 2017 at the earliest. It is now clear that the proposed U.S. waste disposal site, Yucca Mountain in Nevada, will not proceed. Furthermore the US public is “spooked” by Japan’s nuclear accident But technologies are on the move. Future nuclear power plants can reuse the spent nuclear fuel for example. But older power plants are not taking up that technology and their recent license renewals allow them to continue storing waste above ground.
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Lecture 17 Nuclear Blue Ribbon Panel [6] Waste from nuclear energy is extremely dangerous and it has to be carefully stored for ~10,000 years according to U.S. EPA. Despite the dismal overall record of the U.S. nuclear waste program, the Commission believes that success can be achieved. Experience in the United States and abroad has shown that suitable sites for nuclear facilities can be found and can be accepted by relevant stakeholders and that the funds required for the development and operation of an effective nuclear waste program have been, are being, and will continue to be collected. “We know what we have to do, we know we have to do it, and we even know how to do it.” Whether that optimism is justified will be known only “if we start, which is what we urge the Administration and Congress to do, without further delay”
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Lecture 17 Carbon Capture & Sequestration (CCS) Technologies [8] Carbon capture refers to the separation and capture of CO 2 from emissions point sources or the atmosphere and the recovery of a concentrated stream of that CO 2 that can be feasibly stored (sequestered) or converted in such a way as to mitigate its impact as a greenhouse gas. It entails capture of CO 2 from stationary sources, such as fossil fuel-fired power plants and industrial facilities. Research efforts are focused on systems for capturing CO 2 from coal-fired power plants because they are the largest stationary sources of CO 2 . Although current R&D emphasizes CO 2 capture in coal-fired power plants, the carbon capture technologies to be developed will apply to natural gas-fired power plants and possibly directly drawn from autos and the air!
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Lecture 17 CCS Technologies: CO 2
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