Implications of attempting to treat a child with a

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implications of attempting to treat a child with a technique designed for and tested on adults (McGrath, Cumming & Burchard, 2003). Additionally, professionals treating juvenile populations must consider the stigma and common misperceptions surroundingsexual offenses. Practitioners must be careful not to fall into the trap of believing some of the myths that persist in society and among many law enforcement personnel such as a mistaken belief in high 100% recidivism rates and notions like: “these offenders can’t be fixed” (Galeste, Fradella & Vogel, 2012).Juvenile sex offenders differ from adult sex offenders in recidivism rates (much lower for juveniles) and juveniles are, overall, more diverse in terms of their offending behaviors and risk to the public than their adult counterparts (Letourneau & Borduin, 2008). As a matter of fact, Letourneau and Borduin (2008) posit that the profiles of juvenile sex offenders have more in common with other juvenile delinquents than they do with adult sexual offenders. In order to institute good aftercare plans for juvenile offenders, one must start with ongoing assessments that begin when the youth is first placed into care at whatever level is initially determined appropriate. At that time, treatment specific to the

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