MMM LECTURE NOTES FINAL.pdf

Workpart geometry and work materials some of the

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Workpart Geometry and Work Materials : Some of the special workpart shapes for which nontraditional processes are well suited are listed in Table below along with the nontraditional processes that are likely to be appropriate. Table:: Workpart geometric features and appropriate nontraditional processes s.no Geometric Feature Likely Process 1 Very small holes. Diameters less than 0.125 mm (0.005 in), in some cases down to 0.025 mm (0.001 in), generally smaller than the diameter range of conventional drill bits. EBM, LBM 2 Holes with large depth-to-diameter ratios, e.g., d/D > 20. Except for gun drilling, these holes cannot be machined in conventional drilling operations ECM, EDM 3 Holes that are not round. Non-round holes cannot be drilled with a rotating drill bit. EDM, ECM 4 Narrow slots in slabs and plates of various materials. The slots are not necessarily straight. In some cases, the slots have extremely intricate shapes EBM, LBM, WJC, wire EDM, AWJC 5 Micromachining. In addition to cutting small holes and narrow slits, there are other material removal applications in which the workpart and/or areas to be cut are very small. PCM, LBM, EBM 6 Shallow pockets and surface details in flat parts. There is a significant range in the sizes of the parts in this category, from microscopic integrated circuit chips to large aircraft panels. CHM
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Modern Manufacturing Methods 7 Special contoured shapes for mold and die applications. These applications are sometimes referred to as die-sinking EDM, ECM Limitations of Unconventional machining process: Unconventional Machining processes are more expensive Metal removal rate is low AJM, CHM, PAM, and EBM are not commercially economical processes Rapid prototyping Prototyping or model making is one of the important steps to finalize a product design. It helps in conceptualization of a design. Before the start of full production a prototype is usually fabricated and tested. Manual prototyping by a skilled craftsman has been an age- old practice for many centuries. Second phase of prototyping started around mid-1970s, when a soft prototype modeled by 3D curves and surfaces could be stressed in virtual environment, simulated and tested with exact material and other properties. Third and the latest trend of prototyping, i.e., Rapid Prototyping (RP) by layer-by-layer material deposition, started during early 1980s with the enormous growth in Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technologies when almost unambiguous solid models with knitted information of edges and surfaces could define a product and also manufacture it by CNC machining. Year of inception Technology 1770 Mechanization 1946 First computer 1952 First Numerical Control (NC) machine tool 1960 First commercial laser 1961 First commercial Robot 1963 First interactive graphics system (early version of Computer Aided Design) 1988 First commercial Rapid Prototyping system
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Modern Manufacturing Methods BASIC PRINCIPLE OF RAPID PROTOTYPING PROCESSES RP process belong to the generative (or additive) production processes unlike
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  • Fall '12
  • JeraldBrevick
  • EDM, conventional machining processes, Jet Machining

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