Lesson 12 1 Communications advertising and sales objectives Communications

Lesson 12 1 communications advertising and sales

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Lesson 12 1. Communications, advertising, and sales objectives: Communications objectives can be defined as statements of the goals that marketing communications are projected to accomplish within a given timeframe. The buyer- readiness stages are generally used to set appropriate communications objectives. In the textbook, advertising objective is defined as “a specific communication task to be accomplished with a specific target audience during a specific period of time” (p. 501). Since advertising is one element of the promotion mix, communications objectives are broader than advertising objectives. In real life, however,
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depending on their backgrounds, marketers generally use the terms communications objectives and advertising objectives interchangeably. Sales objectives can be defined as the level of sales that a marketer plans to achieve during a given period. Objectives are very important for marketing communicators as they guide message decisions and serve as references for campaign evaluation. There is a passionate debate in the marketing communications field about whether to use typical communications (advertising) objectives (such as those in Table 15.1 on page 501 of the textbook) or sales objectives to evaluate the effectiveness of a communications campaign. Some believe that the final aim of any communications campaign is an increase in sales; others argue that sales do not depend only on communications. What is clear is that some communications activities may have higher impacts on sales than others, depending on the buyer-readiness stages discussed in the previous lesson. 2. Public relations : In Lesson 2, we identified the following types of publics: financial publics, media publics, government publics, citizen-action publics, local publics, the general public, and internal publics (textbook, p. 75). Public relations involves much more than activities designed to sell the company’s products and services. Public relations communications are normally less costly and more credible than advertising communications, as the public does not always realize that companies pay for them either directly or indirectly. Lesson 13 1. Sales force: A distribution channel and a communications tool: We have seen in this course that the main role of a distribution channel is to make a product or service available for use or consumption by the consumer or business user. When you receive a communication from a representative of one of your local utilities providers who offers you a given contract on behalf of the company that he or she works for, this representative is part of the distribution channel put in place to bring the company’s service to customers. This specific distribution channel is often called a sales force (see Figure 12.4, textbook, p. 409). However, the role of a sales force goes beyond making a product or service available and encompasses several other activities—such as prospecting, communicating, and information gathering. The sales force ensures bidirectional communications between a company and its customers.
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