Development of socialising techniques social learning

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Development of Socialising Techniques: Social learning à therapeutic factor that operates in all therapy groups, Nature of skills taught and explicitness of process vary greatly depending on type of group. May be explicit emphasis on development of social skills is adolescent groups: o Group members may be asked to role play approaching prospective employer or asking someone out on a date. o More direct way of social learning. Dynamic therapy groups: o Social learning is more indirect. o Members which have ground rules encouraging open feedback à may obtain considerable information about maladaptive social behaviour. For individuals lacking intimate relationships à group of represents first opportunity for accurate interpersonal feedback. Group therapy provides rich opportunity for members to learn how they contribute to won isolation and loneliness. Frequently senor members of therapy group acquire highly sophisticated social skills. These skills serve these clients well in future social interactions and they constitute cornerstones of emotional intelligence. Recognition and consciousness (although not everything) can often be instrumental in the initial phases of therapeutic change The clients understand that there is a huge discrepancy between their intent and their actual impact on others Allows clients to be responsive to other’s feelings. Imitative behaviour: In time à individuals in group sit, walk, talk and even think like the therapist. Group therapists influence communicational patterns in group by modelling certain behaviours, self- disclosure and support. In groups imitative process is more diffuse à clients may model themselves on aspects of others in group as well as the therapist. Group members learn from watching one another tackle problems.
7 Particularly potent in homogenous groups that focus on shared problems à example, cognitive- behaviour group. Bandura à experimentally demonstrated that imitation is effective therapeutic force. Not uncommon for member to benefit by observing the therapy of another member with similar problems à vicarious or spectator therapy . Imitative behaviour more important role in therapy in the early stages of the group à as members identify with more senior members or therapists. Even if imitative behaviour is short-lived it may help to unfreeze the individual enough to experiment with new behaviour which can start an adaptive spiral. Adaptive spiral : o Process in which one change in a client à changes in his or her interpersonal environment à further personal change. o Small changes cause positive response from other and therefore person makes greater changes. o Client observes behaviour of others within group à tries this behaviour out for themselves within the therapy environment.

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